The concluding episode of Charlie revealed Haughey growing ever-more obsessed with his legacy as the narrative also sought to explain the man behind the image. Photgraph: Patrick Redmond

Brilliantly dramatised series ends with our anti-hero devoid of empathy and emotion

Actor Peter Coonan (left) and artist and former prison inmate Eric Boylan at the launch of the National Prisoner Art Exhibition in City Hall, Dublin. Photograph: Aidan Crawley

National Prisoner Art Exhibition has 100 works by recent and not so recent inmates

Mary Akrami, director of the Afghan Women Skills Development Centre, in Kabul and board member of the Afghan Women’s Network, was keynote speaker at the launch of Frontline Defenders 2015 Annual Report in Dublin. Photographer: Dara Mac Dónaill /THE IRISH TIMES

Mary Akrami speaks at launch of the annual report of Irish NGO Frontline Defenders

Aidan Gillen’s Haughey seems at times detached from the events around him, his face displaying a sort of bored contempt for everyone, foes and allies alike, mildly exasperated that not everyone sees his own genius.

Episode two of RTÉ’s Haughey drama mirrors mad pace of Irish political life in 1982

Mr Haughey, with Mr Tony Gregory, TD, before he started a sponsored cycle from Dublin to Kilnacrott, Co Cavan, to raise money for a holiday home for inner city children in 1982. Photograph: Peter Thursfield

The real people behind the characters in ‘Charlie’, the TV drama based on the life of former taoiseach Charles Haughey

The funeral of Chermaine Carroll at  St Mary’s Church Bennekerry, Co Carlow, who was killed in a collision along with her three friends. Photograph Brenda Fitzsimons/The Irish Times

Bereft family and friends pay moving tribute to loved ones cut down in prime of life

The remains of Gemma Nolan who was  killed in a road collision crash with her three friends arrives at the Holy Family Church, Askea, Carlow. Photograph Brenda Fitzsimons/The Irish Times

More than 1,000 mourners attend funeral of second Athy crash victim in Carlow church

The remains of Chermaine Carroll, one of the Athy crash victims, arriving at St Mary’s Church, Bennekerry, Co Carlow. Photograph: Brenda Fitzsimons

Priest says 20-year-old victim of Athy car crash was ‘bright and bubbly’

“Last year, the Queensland minister for transport Scott Emerson announced a two-year trial of a minimum passing distance for motorists who are overtaking cyclists: one metre on roads with speed limits up to 60km/h and 1.5 metres on faster roads,” said Noel Gibbons, who is a road safety officer with Mayo County Council.

Former TD criticises new plans to legislate on cycling

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