Porsche withdraws two diesel models amid emissions scandal

Manufacturers offer incentives to older car owners to trade in for low emissions models

A hose for an emission test is fixed in the exhaust pipe of a Volkswagen Golf 2.0 litre diesel car. Photograph: AFP/Getty Images

A hose for an emission test is fixed in the exhaust pipe of a Volkswagen Golf 2.0 litre diesel car. Photograph: AFP/Getty Images

 

Porsche has withdrawn diesel versions of its Cayenne SUV and Panamera coupé from the market. No new orders will be taken for either car.

While the German car firm will not go into detail about the reasons behind the move, it is believed to be linked to the ongoing emissions scandal.

The models in question are the 3-litre V6 diesel Cayenne SUV and the Panamera 4S diesel, which was only introduced to market in June last year.

Porsche is already implementing a recall of its diesels as part of efforts by VW Group to change the software on engines fitted with so-called defeat devices, designed to cheat US emissions tests, specifically in relation to harmful nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions.

As anger grows over the motor industry’s failure to control these emissions, German car giants are offering incentives and discounts to the owners of older cars who trade in for low emissions models.

BMW Ireland is offering €2,000 off the price of any car in its fleet with emissions of 130g/km.

Mercedes-Benz Ireland is offering the same amount, although it has yet to specify the limits or criteria of its offer.

VW Group has also said it will introduce an offer scheme though there are no firm details for Ireland as yet.

In Germany the firm has confirmed that it will introduce discounts ranging from €2,000 off a new Up city car, up to €10,000 off a Touareg SUV.

At Audi the scheme in Germany will range from €3,000 to €10,000, depending on the model.

The incentives are among pledges that German automakers made at a meeting last week with political leaders aimed at preventing large-scale limitations to a technology plagued by VW Group’s emissions-test rigging and wider air-quality concerns.

The manufacturers agreed to update pollution-control software on as many as 5.3 million diesel cars, a project estimated to cost 500 million euros industrywide.