Let's settle this once and for all: who are the better drivers, men or women?

Battle of the sexes takes to the road

Tailgating, not indicating, driving while being on a mobile phone, and blasting the horn are the most annoying driver habits, according to a survey by 123.ie

Tailgating, not indicating, driving while being on a mobile phone, and blasting the horn are the most annoying driver habits, according to a survey by 123.ie

 

Tailgating is the offence that most annoys other motorists, according to a survey of nearly 4,000 Irish motorists.

The annual 123.ie car review showed 89 per cent of motorists found tailgating the most annoying trait of other road users, followed by failure to indicate when turning, using a mobile phone while driving, and excessive use of the horn.

The survey also found that the battle of the sexes still exists on our roads, but while men still believe they are better drivers than their female counterparts, when it comes to driving etiquette, both sexes agree that females are more polite on the road.

According to Padraig O’Neill, head of marketing at 123.ie: “Padraig O’Neill said, “Not surprisingly, the things that most annoy us about other drivers are the things that will get drivers into trouble and are extremely dangerous.

"I’ve seen people trying to negotiate a busy roundabout while using their mobile phones and yes, I’ve seen drivers shaving behind the wheel in 7am traffic, but these are the types of behaviours that can lead to accidents.”

On the battle of the sexes, O’Neill says: “When we look at these findings, there is absolutely no ambiguity – men and women each rate their own sex as superior drivers.

While men acknowledge that they have many bad habits, most of which could get them penalty points and a fine, or worse, they still think they are better behind the wheel.

Equally, while women agree that men are better at reversing and parking, they rank themselves superior drivers.”

The findings follow on from the survey results published earlier this month, which showed that two-thirds of motorists support the introduction of 30km/h speed limits in residential areas in Dublin.

It also found that despite the advent of self-driving cars, 51 per cent of those surveyed say they would not feel safe sharing the road with autonomous vehicles, while 62 per cent admitted they would be scared to travel in a self-driving car.

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