Monkstown presents three grand designs

Three striking, well-maintained, period homes have come onto the market in one of Dublin’s prettiest districts and, given that each has its own set of unique and charming characteristics, a buyer in the two million ballpark would be hard-pressed to find a favourite


Address: 38 Seapoint Avenue, Monkstown, Co Dublin
Two-storey over garden level with
plenty of room for its many surprises
Agent: Sherry FitzGerald

Number 38 Seapoint Avenue in Monkstown, Co Dublin is one of those old houses that comes with hidden surprises. One of a pair of houses dating back to the mid-19th century, they were built for a wealthy gentleman who took up residence next door at number 36.

Seapoint railway station was built behind the two houses in 1863 and the same gentleman agreed to give the railway company land to build the station if they built him a carriageway to his stables. Both houses have long tunnels leading from their back gardens to the old stables.

There is a right of way past next door’s bit of the stables to what Sherry FitzGerald call “a secret garden” (or enclosed field) with a ruined workshop, owned by Number 38.

Number 38 is a fine house with high ceilings, well proportioned rooms, intricate ceiling plasterwork and original marble fireplaces. It has been in the same family for 45 years so it’s likely whoever buys it will want to do it up in consultation with a conservation architect as it is a protected structure. It is on the market asking €2.1 million.

The house is two-storey over garden level with 455 sq m (4,900 sq ft) of living space. The rooms at hall level are the grandest and although the hall is a bit dated, the striped Burgundy flock wallpaper sets a stately tone for the rest of the floor. Reception rooms include a front drawing room and a much larger interconnecting sitting room with matching white marble fireplaces. The sitting room has a bay of enormous sash windows commanding views over Dublin Bay and the proportions of this room are impressive. A kitchen to the front of the house strikes an odd note; it looks as if it has been preserved in aspic since the 1970s .

Cellar and storage
Downstairs the garden level has its own entrance and a living room, two double bedrooms, kitchen, bathroom and a utility area. This floor is in real need of an overhaul and has a funky caramel coloured bathroom that should probably be sent back to the 1970s. There’s a wine cellar at this level and a former coal hole, now used for storage. At first floor level there are three double bedrooms, a sitting room with sea views and a kitchen. Up another flight of stairs is a loo with a view, in need of updating.

The rear garden is a series of stepped paved patios and some lawn, leading down to a hidden terrace with sea views obstructed slightly by the overhead wires of the Dart station below.

Another hidden surprise is a side garden with a patio, garden shed, and the remains of an old vegetable garden. It has a door to an area at the front with off street parking. Incidentally, number 36 next door sold for €4.5 million in 2006 despite needing work. If number 38 sells for the asking price, it would represent a 53 per cent drop in value since the peak.

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