Dolly Delinquent designer’s Drumcondra home is pretty in pink

Pieces of Me: Amanda Eustace’s biggest interior design turn-off is blandness

Amanda Eustace, a Dublin-based fashion designer with a background in fine art. Photograph: Nick Bradshaw

Amanda Eustace, a Dublin-based fashion designer with a background in fine art. Photograph: Nick Bradshaw

 

Amanda Eustace is a Dublin-based fashion designer with a background in fine art. Having graduated with a fine-art degree from DIT, she went on to study fashion at the Grafton Academy after which she founded her label Dolly Delinquent, the name prompted by the John Waters movie Cry Baby (“He’s a doll, he’s a dreamboat, he’s a delinquent”). Made in Ireland it is stocked in Atelier 27, Om Diva and online at dollydelinquent.com. Working mainly with tulle, her collections are playful and seasonless, her latest inspired by 1920s circus performers showing a darker side to the label that remains romantic in spirit. She calls it Rogue Ethereal and it goes on sale online and in-store from October.

Describe your interiors style

I live in a small Victorian cottage in Drumcondra and so even though I love the no-frills, no-fuss French Parisian style, I am not restrained enough because I have too many knick-knacks to hide away. People describe it as a doll’s house because it’s colourful, cosy and fun.

Amanda Eustace’s favourite favourite cover it is the Archies’ Sugar Sugar. Photograph Nick Bradshaw
Amanda Eustace’s favourite favourite cover it is the Archies’ Sugar Sugar. Photograph Nick Bradshaw

What room do you most enjoy?

My favourite room is the pink room, as I call it – a lovely room where I spend most of my time. It’s at the front of the house, so it has beautiful high ceilings and a large window, so the light is lovely. The front of the house has high ceilings, I think to trick people into thinking that the house is much grander than it is. It’s a very relaxing room, and the colours – all pink – are really nice, pink being always my favourite colour.

What items do you love most?

My guitar which I got in Musicmaker is really special and gets pride of place. I play piano and taught myself guitar and have played in a few bands. I call it Belinda Carlisle because we both have red hair. Another item I love is a pink tulle dress, which was the first of the Rainbow Bright Collection that I made last year. I keep some of my records stored on a picture ledge, a handy way of finding what I am looking for, and they are works of art in themselves. My favourite cover is the Archies’ Sugar Sugar, which I keep on top; it suits the look of the house.

Dress detail. Photograph Nick Bradshaw
Dress detail. Photograph Nick Bradshaw

Who are your favourite designers?

I love designers who push the boundaries of art and fashion and who are not afraid to be fun and be a little tongue-in-cheek, like Meadham Kirchhoff, Vivienne Westwood, Alexander McQueen and Viktor & Rolf. I like Gucci and Dolce & Gabbana for their opulence and rich fabrics and Miu Miu for the sense of fun and colour.

What artists do you admire?

I love collecting art so my house is filled with all sorts. My favourite painting is by my friend Lucy McKenna – the colours she uses complement the house very well and add vibrancy to the room, and all the different textures draw you in to take a closer look. I have a series of nine tiny little paintings measuring two inches each by the Irish illustrator Barry Quinn telling the story of a little goat dreaming of the tree he is eating growing bigger so he can climb it and gorge himself on the leaves.

Amanda Eustace’s series of nine tiny little paintings measuring two inches each by the Irish illustrator Barry Quinn. Photograph: Nick Bradshaw
Amanda Eustace’s series of nine tiny little paintings measuring two inches each by the Irish illustrator Barry Quinn. Photograph: Nick Bradshaw

Biggest interior turn-off?

Blandness. I guess your home should show your personality. I hate magnolia walls, clutter and corduroy couches.

Destination that stands out?

For me it is Italy, especially Florence and Verona, where everything is steeped in history and there is art everywhere you turn, so it is very inspiring.

If you had €100,000 to spend on anything for the home, what would that be?

I would build a sound-recording studio and music room extension big enough to house a baby grand piano, which I have always wanted. And I would not have to worry about annoying the neighbours.

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