Yeats makes double the estimate as art market rebounds

His landscape ‘Early Morning, Cliffony’, from the late Gillian Bowler collection, achieves a hammer price of €70,000 at Adam’s sale

 

It was a big week for the Irish art market, with two major sales taking place within two days: Whyte’s Irish and International Art sale on Monday and, on Wednesday, Adam’s Important Irish Art, which included works from the collection of the late Gillian Bowler.

And the verdict? “Overall we were delighted with the results,” said Ian Whyte, after the Monday sale realised a total of €1.7 million. “It looks like the ‘Celtic Phoenix’ is having a good influence.” At Adam’s on Wednesday, the same phoenix soared off the scale as Gillian Bowler’s Jack B Yeats landscape Early Morning, Cliffony romped past its estimate of €25,000 to €35,000 to achieve a hammer price of €70,000. This after William Scott’s Blue Still Life made €450,000 at Whyte’s (estimate €400,000-€600,000) as it headed to a collector in London.

The big-name winner at both sales was Louis le Brocquy, whose tapestry Adam and Eve in the Garden made €140,000 at Whyte’s (€80,000-€120,000) while his painting Fan Tailed Pigeons sold at the Adam’s sale for €58,000 (€40,000-€60,000). Gerard Dillon’s Men and Boats, Connemara made an impressive €36,000 at Whyte’s (€5,000-€7,000) and his Model and Canvas made €9,700 at Adam’s (€4,000-€6,000). The English abstract expressionist Albert Irvin also proved popular: at Whyte’s, Abstract, 1988 made €9,500 (€6,000-€8,000), while at Adam’s, Gillian Bowler’s Irvin painting, Tanze, made an impressive €13,000 (€5,000-€7,000).

Some further results from the Whyte’s sale: An Irish Bog, by Paul Henry, made €130,000 (€100,000-€150,000). Man and Wife, wood sculpture by FE McWilliam, made €70,000 (€70,000-€90,000). Grey Bridge, Regent’s Park, London, by William John Leech made €25,000 (€8,000-€12,000); Flow, a bronze sculpture by Linda Brunker, made €16,000 (€10,000-€15,000); Betty, daughter of Edgar Oliver, Wimbledon, by John Butler Yeats made €12,500 (€8,000-€12,000); Coliemore Harbour, Dalkey, Co Dublin, by Harry Kernoff, made €5,600 (€1,500-€2,000) and Scéalaíocht na Ríthe, a cover title for a story collection by Micheál MacLiammóir, made €5,200 (€400-€600).

Some further results from the Adam’s sale: A Turf Quay, by Sean Keating, made €40,000 (€40,000- €60,000). Gubellaunaun from the Bog, by Paul Henry, made €36,000 (€30,000-€40,000). The Bath, by Patrick Collins, made €33,000 (€20,000-€30,000). Dans les Vignes, by Nathaniel Hone, made €32,000 (€20,000-€30,000). Two studies of Joyce, by Louis le Brocquy, made €32,000 (€20,000-€30,000). Horse with Object II, by Basil Blackshaw, made €23,000 (€15,000-€20,000). Blue Nude, by Barrie Cooke, made €17,000 (€15,000-€20,000). Portora for Tony Flanagan, by Terence P Flanagan, made €12,500 (€5,000-€7,000).

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