Food File: The weekly food news round-up

Fri, Jan 31, 2014, 01:00

Be our Valentine
If you’re planning to cook a lavish St Valentine’s Day dinner for someone, tell us about it, and instead of slaving over pots and pans, you could find yourself as VIP guests of Graham Neville, head chef at Restaurant FortyOne, at Residence, on St Stephens Green in Dublin.

Under Neville’s direction the restaurant was Good Food Ireland’s Reaurant of The Year 2013 . He describes his cooking style as having “no heavy starch sauces or over reliance on double cream and fats”. The lighter touch the chef favours brings vibrancy and elegance to his menus. “Vegetables and fruit juices are produced in our kitchen and grown in our own garden. I integrate raw vegetables and cooked vegetables in dishes to maximise taste and texture,” he says.

If that sounds like your style of cooking too, tell us about the menu you plan to cook on Friday, February 14th, and instead of putting on an apron you could be dressing up and enjoying a bespoke menu for two, cooked by Neville and served in either a private room or the main dining room. Each course will be served personally and introduced by Neville, and the winners will also enjoy an aperitif and wines chosen by sommelier Jean-Baptiste Letinois .

Restaurant FortyOne will be offering a St Valentine’s tasting menu on February 14th, but the winner will be served a menu for two, created specially for them.

To enter: Email your ultimate St Valentine’s Day dinner menu to valentine@irishtimes.com, by noon on Friday, February 7th, also enclosing your name, address and telephone number.

Graham Neville will select a winner, and will create a menu based on the preferences indicated in the winning entry. The prize is strictly non-transferable. The judges’ decision is final. Terms and conditions apply.
See restaurantfortyone.ie

Cook at Kelly’s
Paul Flynn, chef/patron at the Tannery restaurant in Dungarvan, will join in-house chefs Eugene Callaghan and Stephane Rochard at a midweek cookery break at Kelly’s Resort Hotel & Spa on February 23rd to 28th. The package starts with afternoon tea on arrival, dinner in Beaches restaurant that night, followed by four days of morning cookery demonstrations (1am-1pm), with breakfast, lunch and dinner included each day. Flynn will bring his good humour and classical cookery techniques to the table on the first two days, after which Callaghan, the hotel’s executive chef will take over, and on the final day Rochard, who heads up the hotel’s cafe in Wexford, will cover patisserie. The five-night package costs €560 per person sharing. See kellys.ie.


Cake Café online shop
The Cake Café in Dublin has launched an online shop where you can buy linens in its signature graphic designs, as well as vouchers for a baking class (€55), or afternoon tea with sweet and savoury food and a glass or wine or Prosecco (€19.95). The latest linens, designed by Pony Design Studio and made in Ireland, include a pair of tea towels (€17.95), aprons (€18.50) and napkins (€15 for two). You can also pick up some of the cafe’s baking equipment such as a profesional quality loose-base nine-inch cake tin (€18), and these cute sprinkles, which come in two sizes (€7). See thecakecafe.ie


Dairy desserts
The family-owned Glenilen Dairy Farm in Drimoleague, Co Cork has expanded its production base to include a range of single serve desserts , with panna cotta and chocolate mousse joining the cheesecake for which the brand is best known. Valerie Kingston has been making and selling cheesecakes since 1997, and she and her husband Alan also produce yoghurts, creme fraiche, clotted cream and farm butter. The family’s immersion in their business extends to the branding – the little girl in the company logo is daugher Sally, and the cow, Sue, was Valerie’s first pet. The new desserts are on sale in Tesco, Supervalu, Centra, Avoca, Donnybrook Fair and Morton’s, priced €1.75.

Honey for health
If you’ve succumbed to one of the cold and ’flu bugs currently doing the rounds, or if you’d like to avoid them, a spoonful of Manuka honey could be helpful. Watson & Son, producers of Manuka honey in New Zealand, say that its anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory qualitites are the key. It uses the Methylglyoxal number method to determine the level of anitibacterial honey in its products – the higher the number the more activity. It’s available nationwide in supermarkets and costs frpm €9.99. See watsonandson.co.nz
marieclairedigby@irishtimes.com

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