My straitjacket: a suit, a shirt and a tie

Our man in the Dáil on the tyranny of the suit, inches of which have to be lopped off to fit him, has rubbish pockets and is useless for cycling in

Ann Finn, head of personal shopping in menswear at Brown Thomas, tries to change Harry McGee’s mind about suits by decking him out in a Canali suit, €1,050; Eton shirt, €129; Drakes of London tie, €125; and Prada shoes, €480. HARRY’S VERDICT: “The suit Ann chose was very comfortable, the shirt is easy to iron and doesn’t become a crumpled mess with movement. Her advice was to leave everything out of the pockets and go for a man bag – for many Irish men, that remains a step too far.” Photograph: Dave Sleator

Ann Finn, head of personal shopping in menswear at Brown Thomas, tries to change Harry McGee’s mind about suits by decking him out in a Canali suit, €1,050; Eton shirt, €129; Drakes of London tie, €125; and Prada shoes, €480. HARRY’S VERDICT: “The suit Ann chose was very comfortable, the shirt is easy to iron and doesn’t become a crumpled mess with movement. Her advice was to leave everything out of the pockets and go for a man bag – for many Irish men, that remains a step too far.” Photograph: Dave Sleator

Wed, Apr 2, 2014, 01:00

McGee in his sports gear. HARRY'S VERDICT: 'It's not exactly a red carpet outfit but, maybe it's theLeft: McGee in his sports gear. HARRY'S VERDICT: 'It's not exactly a red carpet outfit but, maybe it's the scout in me who never grew up, I could spend my whole life dressed like this.' 

Every weekday morning I loop a necktie around my collar, fasten the top button of my shirt, and undertake the daily ritual of garrotting myself, knowing it will be at least eight hours before I can breathe again.

My job requires a lot of things. The ability to write. To be quick off the mark in getting things done. To be reasonably personable and perceptive. Shorthand. Fast typing. The occasional nice turn of phrase. The skill of getting excited at very uninteresting things in the bubble of Leinster House and inflicting it upon our readers.

Unfortunately, it also requires the wearing of a suit, a shirt and a tie.

For over a decade – half of my journalistic career – I’ve been living in the world of the suit. I am based in the Oireachtas and write about politics. Unlike Pink Mick or Luke Ming in his Muppet T-shirts, the political scribblers are subject to a strict dress code in Leinster House. But more generally, it is expected of us.

That essentially means a suit. And even 10 years after I started to wear one regularly, I still can’t get used to it and I still bear a resentment towards it.

My problem with the suit is this: to borrow the vogue political phrase, it is not fit for purpose. Or perhaps, to be more accurate, not fit for my purpose. Where does the fault lie? Well, it is partly it. And it is partly me.

Let’s take me first. For one, there’s a physiological issue. I’m small in height but stocky, with short limbs and the hips of a farmhand. So any time I’ve taken a suit off the peg, by the time I’m swaddled in it, the inches of fabric that have had to be lopped off have given it an unfashionable look and the nice details – such as four buttons on the cuff or fancy piping – have all hit the cutting-room floor.


Old-fashioned fabrics
Ah, you say, nothing that a good tailor couldn’t fix. But my difficulties extend beyond that, to suits themselves. They are ridiculously impractical.

Where do I begin? For one, the fabrics take little heed of technology or modern innovation. I am an avid mountaineer and I am constantly amazed at the new fabrics and designs to keep the wearer warm, cool or comfortable. They include hard shells, soft shells, wicking, wind-resistance, rain-proofing, breathability and innovative use of traditional fabrics such as merino wool and down. They keep you warm without weighing you down. They are reinforced where there is friction or impact, such as at the knees, elbows and seat. They have plenty of pockets in the right places to help you store things, including all your technology and accoutrements. No, the brand names that excite me aren’t Hugo Boss, Prada or Paul Smith; rather Patagonia, Mountain Equipment and Arc’teryx.

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