Birdy’s quest for a diva saviour at the Peacock

It’s the handover period between Dublin festivals this week as the Dublin Fringe Festival begins to wind up and the Dublin Theatre(...)

Broken Crow’s Levin and Levin.  Photograph: Marcin Lewandowski

Fleeing persecution, the Levin Brothers conceal their sex and identity, and grow into a vaudevillian act that wanders the world. T(...)

Lucy McCormick’s Triple Threat. Photograph: The Other Richard

When people believe in nothing, they may turn to showbiz, argues Lucy McCormick’s New Testament trash cabaret. But the bigger ques(...)

Gleeson seems undecided as to where his character is from so settles  for Naturalised American Irish Bear

Beneath the generic cat and mouse game is a picture of American masculinity and its fateful engine trouble

Siri made flesh: Detective Richard Madden and telepath Holliday Grainger, a psychic search engine

TV review: Another Philip K Dick adaptation, in this boom time for paranoia

The latest reviews including Birdy, Everything Now, Kicking All The Boxes, Raven Eyed and MDLSX

Not At Home

The latest show from the Dublin Fringe Festival

In the first instalment of the season, Pat Kenny  tackles the housing crisis in stark and personal terms, by imagining the people watching him.  Photograph: Gareth Chaney/Collins

The Pat Kenny Show imagines the nation not as it could be, but as it is, an easily goaded, roiling mess

Sadly, for a community so unrepresented on the Irish stage, an inattentive production doesn’t make access any easier

The walls in this small, over-extended production are built on weak foundations

End of at the Dublin Fringe Festival

Here is our selection of the best shows opening this weekend, and the best productions still running that we've seen so far

Stunned by a  shop redesign, Kara Maher regards her reorganised rails with something like awe: ‘She’s just literally put options together’

It’s hard to say how seriously RTÉ’s new show is taking its fashionable subject

How did Richard Dormer’s agent not talk him out of playing the lead?

The gimmick in Rellik is to tell a detective story in reverse. It’s not too late to back out now

Conor O’Toole nails the countless sly cheats that journalists call professionalism

Fringe review: Enter the offices of The Dublin Correspondænt and bring your controversial opinions

From the Hollywoo hills: A scene from Bojack Horseman

The Netflix series, which has celebrity guests fighting for a place, is in it for the long run

Roth’s  own reflection will stare back at him like an inert Mr Hyde

Tin Star plays merry havoc with chronology and character, but to no real consequence

‘Listen carefully and you can hear  Mark and Jeremy  cackling’

Back review: The Peep Show duo are now a fully mature odd couple, prone to looking back, in Simon Blackwell's new comedy

Performances of Trophy are free but ticketed

This year’s fringe is packed with potential: here’s the ones we think will make the cut

‘I’m done with humble,’ says Caoilfhionn Dunne’s mercurial Katie, shrugging off the shackles of 1930s Ireland. ‘Didn’t I always know I have greatness in me.’

In 1930s rural Ireland, Katie Roche is a young woman with notions. In 2017, this revival of Teresa Deevy’s neglected classic has c(...)

Kris Nelson: In his time the Fringe Festival has become bigger. Photograph: Brenda Fitzsimons

Kris Nelson is cramming as much as possible into his final Dublin Fringe Festival

A Tribe Called Quest on the Main Stage at Electric Picnic. Photograph: Michael Donnelly

Hip-hop icons sound as fresh as ever on the Main Stage, while Bill Bailey tackles the DUP

The xx on the main stage at Electric Picnic. Photograph: Dave Meehan

London trio seem slightly awed by Stradbally’s response

The Electric Picnic crowd showing their appreciation. Photograph: Dave Meehan

There’s room for growing up, but Super Silly provide a heady mix

The Red Bull Soundome before the EP masses descended. Photograph: Ryan Byrne/Inpho

A world first for EP: half a giant golf ball of sound

Pacho Herrera (a menacingly silken Alberto Ammann) is ruthlessly violent and out-and-proud in an immensely homophobic culture in Narcos

The drugs drama returns with true stories that beggar belief

Unquestionably good grooming on show with Hudson Taylor. Photograph: Stephen Collins/Collins

A singalong. A handclap. Even a new song ‘Feel it Again’ sounds vigorously familiar

Caoilfhionn Dunne as Katie Roche, a Waterford woman of some importance

On the boards: Abbey stages 1936 play by the oft-neglected Teresa Deevy, and Stefanie Preissner directs Margaret McAuliffe’s one-w(...)

Caoilfhionn Dunne performs Katie as an otherworldly figure

For the Abbey’s new production of Teresa Deevy’s neglected classic, ‘Katie Roche’, the theatre turned to the trailblazing director(...)

Uta Frith watches her dubious interviews on a television in a London flat so swish it would send Patrick Bateman into a murderous envy

Uta Frith tries to come up with some answers based on some deeply alarming interviews

‘Have you ever considered learning how to lie?’ asks an exasperated Tyrion

Season finale: It’s the politics, cynicism and raw emotion that make this gripping TV

Eva O’Connor’s new show, The Friday Night Effect, co-authored by  Hildegard Ryan, asks its audience to intervene at regular, critical junctures

A new theatre show allows the audience to vote throughout. Would you make the right decisions?

Bleep, bloop, bash: the NYT cast in R.U.R.

To hell with humans; we’re on the terminators’ side, in NYT’s reboot of Karel Capek’s 1921 play

Alyssa Sutherland in The Mist

Bundling the gravity of sexual assault into the hokum of killer fog is a mistake

When they open up an underground clinic for criminals and odd bods, it hardly seems coincidental that most of it takes place in a green-grey light

Peter Kosminsky’s four-part drama shows how. But what about the why?

The Hound is a favourite among the Back Page crowd

Hell is other spoilers among a community of GoT watchers in Dublin

When they open up an underground clinic for criminals and odd bods, it hardly seems coincidental that most of it takes place in a green-grey light

The latest TV import is a dark moral satire about what desperate people will do – but don’t let that stop you from digging in

Boys on tour: Jon Snow and co head north of the wall

The penultimate episode is so gripping you half expect to see yourself listed in the credits

Marvel’s The Defenders: unburdened by characterisation, personality or much decent dialogue

TV review: Four telly superheroes join forces against a common enemy – our patience

Outlying Islands at the Samuel Beckett Theatre

This week at the theatre, you find robotic revolutions, a threatened Eden and other unlikely relationships.

Dr Javid Abdelmoneim with his classroom of kids who are going gender free for six weeks. Photograph: Outline Productions

TV review – No More Boys and Girls: Can Our Kids Go Gender Free? has some answers

Quacks: ‘Some say the more bloody the coat, the greater the surgeon’

The BBC’s new comedy looks like a medical marvel in the making

Jon Snow, King of the North,  might now be an unwitting Dragon King in waiting

The beast sniffs out Jon’s Targaryen parentage in an emotional CGI encounter

Counting Sheep is  an immersive folk opera using traditional songs  performed by the Lemon Bucket Orchestra. Photograph: Dahlia Katz

Counting Sheep began life at the heart of the revolution on Ukraine’s Maidan. Is it more than radical tourism?

Loosysmokes, ahead of the world premiere of Raven Eyed at The Brewhouse, Abbey Creative Quarter, in Kilkenny. Phoyograph: Pat Moore

As the world threatens to spin apart, this year’s arts festival concentrates on what keeps it together – just about

Hubert and Peggy Butler

Johnny Gogan’s biography of Hubert Butler finds this Irish George Orwell honoured by his intellectual inheritors

Faking it: Jodie Whittaker plays a nurse pretending to be an A&E doctor

How long will it be before Jodie Whittaker’s A&E doctor is found out? Longer than it takes for the many implausibilities of Trust (...)

That feeling when you realise you’ve brought a horse to a dragon fight

The long-hoped-for sequence of a screeching creature and burning soldiers feels weird

Prince Charles and Princess Diana  on their wedding day on July 29th, 1981. Photograph: RC/HO REUTERS

‘Diana In Her Own Words’ documentary shows a woman fascinated by media

In Grease, ‘virginity is as big a stigma as an unwanted pregnancy’

Grease has got groove, it’s got feeling. But this unctuous performance is hardly slick

Issa Rae in Insecure: ‘Her  wry expressions and disarming smile can make even the slightest joke work’

Issa Rae’s show grows more confident even as its heroine does not

Man in an Orange Shirt: A compassionate evocation of how sexuality is contorted when criminalised

Patrick Gale’s debut screen drama is based on the compromise of his own parents

Game of Thrones Episode 3:  Daenerys Targaryen, Mother of Dragons, meets Jon Snow, Reluctant King of the North

Game of Thrones Season 7, Episode 3 Review: Free of the unwieldy fantasy books that inspired it, the show is thriving

Women dressed as handmaids promoting the Hulu original series The Handmaid’s Tale, stand along a public street during the South by Southwest Music Film Interactive Festival in Austin, Texas, Photograph:  Reuters/Brian Snyder

The series adapted from Margaret Atwood’s novel has given birth to a real-world army

Aaron Monaghan in The Second Violinist. Photograph: Patrick Redmond

A lonely life is subsumed into this collaboration between Donnacha Dennehy and Enda Walsh

A fabulously transformed Nicole Kidman,  plays a Germaine Greer-idolising feminist

Jane Campion’s superb detective drama returns to BBC

If anyone can record and release music on their iPhone, says Charlie Fink’s character, the most radical gesture now is to leave behind a ‘silence in the shape of an album’. Photograph:  Gaelle Beri/Redferns/Getty

Charlie Fink and David Greig’s smart, subtle collaboration depicts a relationship, a separation and a hard act to follow

George Logan, one of the real voices at the heart of Against the Law.  Photograph: Fergus O’Brien

Against the Law review:: One interviewee was well informed about the Wolfenden committee because he was sleeping with the son of i(...)

Jimmy’s Hall

Jimmy’s Hall, Tennessee Williams and some fresh Rivals

The show suggests that dancing really is Gralton’s cure for everything

Jimmy Gralton was infamously deported from his own country for giving his community a space for dancing and revolutionary ideas. T(...)

Willie White, artist director of the Dublin Theatre Festival blowing the 60th anniversary candles with Lynn Parker  (Rough Magic, Melt ), Ollie West (from  Hamnet), Grace Cathal (from Girl Song) and Sean McGinley (from King of the Castle, Druid). Photograph: Cyril Byrne

Festival director Willie White says programme is about ‘keeping our momentum’

The cast of Druid’s Penelope by Enda Walsh  in Washington: Olga Wehrly, Niall Buggy, Karl Shiels, Aaron Monghan and Denis Conway

The Druid stalwart nearly gave up acting in the wake of DruidMurphy but he's kept working to improve himself and his art. “It’s li(...)

Jon Snow: any spare dragonglass going?

Who can you trust these days in war-torn, backstabbing, deeply divided Westeros?

Eoin Cannon as Frank, Jacinta Whyte as Angela, Marty Maguire as Malachy and Bryan Burroughs in Angela’s Ashes. Photograph: Patrick Redmond

The new musical jabs at some nerves – its vision of homelessness and hunger are not distant threats

Jason Bateman in Ozark

Jason Bateman plays a straitlaced man who turns to crime in desperate times. Stop us if you’ve heard this one before ...

Aaron Monaghan in ‘The Second Violinist’ at Black Box in Galway, part of the Galway International Arts Festival

Sex and violins from Enda Walsh and Donnacha Dennehy, and Limerick’s own Les Mis

 Siobhán Cullen,  Kate Stanley Brennan and  Amy McElhatton in  Mark O’Rowe’s Crestfall. Photograph:  Stephen Cummiskey

Mark O’Rowe’s unloved and long unpublished play has finally returned from the dark. Perhaps it might have stayed there

Kneehigh Theatre presents Tristan and Yseult  as part of the 40th Galway International Arts Festival . Photograph:  Steve Tanner

Kneehigh’s shipshape, fleet production comes closer to home at the Galway International Arts Festival

MyAnna Buring as DI Helen Weeks gets her breakthroughs in an unusual fashion

This BBC shows presents us with a crime and a detective that both need to be solved

Patrick O’Kane as Woyzeck and Shane O’Reilly as Andres in Woyzeck in Winter, which  opened at the Black Box Theatre  as part of the Galway International Arts Festival.  Photograph:  Colm Hogan

Woyzeck and Schubert meet in a lambent, music-hall spectacle

Daenerys sets out to to reclaim her gloomy ancestral home, Dragonstone

The first episode of the new season arrives into a changed world and women are on the warpath

Cersei Lannister now sits upon the Iron Throne, but given the fate of her children, she may not be the most benevolent ruler

As the new season starts, here's the state of play in Westeros and beyond

I’ll drink to that: The Great Gatsby at the Gate Theatre in Dublin is a full-blown party, complete with cocktails for the audience. Photograph: Dara Mac Dónaill

Culture Shock: The Gate’s ‘Great Gatsby’ immerses the audience in alcohol, and not just in the play

Much of Emma Rice’s career has been invested in fairy tales, such as her famed production of ‘The Red Shoes’. Photograph:  Anne Cusack/Los Angeles Times

At a bleak time to live in London, the Globe artistic director decided to base her farewell season around love

Friends from College: ‘vacillates between wired comic energy  and more serious intimations of betrayal and missed opportunities’. Photograph: Netflix

Mopey Xennials get together for a 20-year college reunion and hover between Gen X cynicism and Millennial optimism

All that jazz: Cast and audience get into the swing of things in The Great Gatsby. Photograph: Agata Stoinska

The audience joins in the decadence in the Gate Theatre’s thrillingly immersive production

Patrick O’Kane and Camille O’Sullivan in Woyzeck in Winter

The Galway Arts Festival celebrates its 40th anniversary with an ambitious, wide-ranging programme

Actor Owen Roe in a party sene from ‘The Great Gatsby’ at the Gate Theatre, Dublin

Designed to include members of the audience, the Gate Theatre’s adaptation of F Scott Fitzgerald’s novel begins at the door

Liam Carney and Lorcan Cranitch in Two Pints

Roddy Doyle’s series finds skilful new shape in the Abbey’s pub-crawling two-hander

 Christy Dignam, lead singer of Aslan, performs during the Bulmer’s Evening Meeting in Leopardstown, Co Dublin in 2016. Photograph:  Cody Glenn/Sportsfile

This Is Christy review: Music is more than a source of succour in this part biography, part tour diary of the Aslan frontman Chris(...)

On Francis Brennan’s tour, anyone not found laughing is an automatic pariah

Francis Brennan’s Grand Tour of Vietnam review: If you ever sat through someone else’s holiday snaps, you’ll know the feeling

Ahead of season seven, here’s everything you need to know about the ground-breaking fantasy drama

El Chapo: He’s ruthless, enjoys tunnels and relies on a single scowling facial expression

The Netflix show can’t discern between the gravity of fact and the thrill of fiction

Charlene McKenna, The Great Gatsby Gate Theatre. Dublin

If the nation does not come to the theatre, the theatre must go out to the nation

Kris Nelson is departing as Dublin Fringe Festival director to take up a job in London with Lift. Photograph: Brenda Fitzsimons

Dublin festival is now seeking a new artistic director and a new general manager

‘A surface politeness so unyielding it would send chills down a maître d’s spine’: Nashville, and Nathan Carter

A city of constant professionalism, Nashville should suit the Irish country music star just fine

To play soccer in 1950s Ireland was to defy a nationalist agenda. John Giles had plenty to renounce

Naomi Watts in Gypsy: this show does  not trust its viewers to grasp its subtleties

Naomi Watts and Billy Crudup get lost down rabbit hole of mind games

Sudan, slow, unhappy and torpid as he pads glumly around the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya, his retirement home

A documentary on the last male of the northern white rhinoceros can’t decide to proceed with a light step or a heavy heart

The new  Shaw Room of the National Gallery of Ireland. Photograph:  Marie Louise Halpenny

In this documentary, the National Gallery gets a depiction worthy of its renovation

Harrison Wilding and Witney White in Room

The songs in this adaptation are curiously conventional for an unconventional piece

Blade Runner 2049: the sequel emerges as the world has just about caught up with the dark forecasts of the original, set in 2019

Culture Shock: ‘Futureproof’ shows how prescient it can be to imagine the worst

Squared circle: Alison Brie in Glow. Photograph: Netflix

Second-wave feminism gets Reagan-era chauvinism into a headlock in this enjoyable confection about empowerment and the media

John Walsh, doing his driving test at the age of 101

TV review: Too Old For the Road? quickly becomes a vehicle for wider, poignant considerations

The cast of Redwater, which was filmed in Wicklow, includes Fionnula Flanagan and Ian McElhinney

Festering with secrets and toxic family dynamics, it’s easier to get into Redwater than it is to ever leave it. Unless you’re a vi(...)

Julia Stiles, ‘a fascinatingly flat actor’, as Georgina Clios in Riviera

It’s a quality show that could also pass as a satire on the budgets of prestige television

Helen McCrory as  tough-talking, chain-smoking, whiskey-swilling human rights lawyer Emma Banville

A breathless show that fast-tracks every plot and character and goes all the way to the top

Lisa Dwan in No’s Knife, now at the Abbey Theatre

The actor gives Beckett’s words a more aggressive, tortured reading

Susan Ateh as Bernie with Fionnuala Flanagan as   Agnes, ‘who alters between being casually disparaging or stridently demonic’. Photograph:  Patrick Redmond/BBC

The knotty TV drama shot in Dunmore East is nearing its conclusion

I Am a Bird: ‘A play full of swift, involving ideas and deep personal feeling’

Ross Gaynor’s tough monologue is set in the aftermath of a terrorist attack

Orange is the New Black kicks off season five

The clock is ticking for Piper, but she stopped being the show’s star long ago

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