Music history is written by the victors, but they are getting harder to spot

Within the rampant fragmentation that’s been with us for so long, the victors have become much harder to identify

You only have to look at Ireland’s Crash Ensemble (above) and Concorde to see how divergent programming patterns can be

You only have to look at Ireland’s Crash Ensemble (above) and Concorde to see how divergent programming patterns can be

Wed, Feb 5, 2014, 01:00

History is written by the victors. And that applies to musical history, too: Mozart and Beethoven rather than Clementi; Wölfl or Steibelt; Wagner rather than Meyerbeer; Rachmaninov rather than Medtner; Schoenberg rather than Hauer; Copland rather than Bowles; Messiaen rather than Landowski; Shostakovich rather than Khrennikov.

The victors are pretty clear when it comes to the history of performance too: orchestras, choirs, the opera (against all the apparent odds), songs, the piano, the string quartet and various other ensembles, especially duos involving virtuosos.

Closer inspection, as you would expect, yields a picture that is rather less clear. It is not just that less orthodox combinations are less common, but their repertoire is also less standardised. The overlap between one guitar quartet or brass quintet and another is often minimal to non-existent, whereas string quartets and piano duos are likely to share a lot.

The same mutual exclusivity of repertoire applies in the area of new music ensembles. Here in Ireland, you only have to look at the activities of the best-known contemporary music groups – Crash Ensemble and Concorde – to see how divergent programming patterns can be. If you add in any other group that explores new music, the pattern of diversity persists.

In fact, for the last 100 years or so, composers have shown an insatiable appetite for writing for an extraordinary range of mixed chamber ensembles. Schoenberg’s Pierrot Lunaire set a kind of pattern for smaller groups, and his Chamber Symphony a pattern for larger ones. And the ensembles that were set up by enthusiastic musicians have all spawned works written for their individual line-ups, or for subsets of those line-ups.

Unlike most string quartets or trios, wind quintets or brass quintets, the programmes of Concorde and Crash, like the programmes of their international peers large and small, don’t usually find all the members of the group featured in all the works.


Identifying the victors
Within the rampant fragmentation that’s been with us for so long, the victors are much harder to identify, and, it must also be said, much less likely to be celebrated in the normal run of events, given that the experts so often choose to restrict themselves to doing their own kind of thing.

Two of this week’s concerts – the premiere of Simon O’Connor’s What Is Living and What Is Dead at the Pepper Canister Church on Wednesday, and the Irish Composers Collective concert by the Robinson Panoramic Quartet at the National Concert Hall’s Kevin Barry Room on Monday – set me thinking about how the issue must look to composers.

Take the Robinson Panoramic Quartet, whose colourful name reflects the unusual line-up (violin, viola, cello and double bass) and the fact that two of the members are from one family (Malachy Robinson on double bass, and his violinist wife, Anita Vedres, who have teamed up with viola player Robin Panter and cellist Kate Ellis).

Robinson’s spoken introductions would have had you believe that the idea of extending the range of a string quartet downwards through the addition of a double bass – and in the process ensuring that the ensemble has four distinctive voices rather than the violin doubling of the standard string quartet – must be manna from heaven for composers.

But that’s not how composers seem to have seen it over the years. A quick look at Margaret K Farish’s String Music in Print, issued in the mid-1960s, draws a complete blank. And in my own experience the Panoramic’s line-up is most often encountered as a subset of a larger group, most often quintets with piano (Schubert’s Trout Quintet the most famous), or octets with wind instruments.

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