Andrés Barba: his novel ‘possesses disarming genius and complex layers of truth, heightened by glimpses of understanding accompanied by near panic’.

August, October is beyond impressive, it is the real thing, a study of how the mind and memory attempts to make sense of emotion a(...)

Brian Friel “was fatherly, kind, practical and funny. He seemed to look deep into the centre of things.” File photograph:  Dara Mac Dónaill/The Irish Times

‘Our world is better for having had Brian Friel in it and now seems a lot smaller’

A mix of travelogue and memoir, anecdote and specialist study, this meditation on a mineral, by the author of ‘The Hare With Amber(...)

From the Archive: Reports, previews and photographs from 1930’s National Ploughing Championship reports. Photograph: The Irish Times

From the archives: On the last day of the 1996 national championships, Eileen Battersby looks ahead to the world competition and t(...)

Canadian author’s wry voice shines through her grim tale

Hanya Yanagihara: A Little Life (Picador)

‘Big’ may have seduced Man Booker 2015 judges, while Anne Enright left on longlist

The fourth and final novel in Elena Ferrante’s Neapolitan quartet is frustrating and exhausting, but also haunting thanks to her t(...)

Salman Rushdie, outside the main branch of the New York Public Library. Photograph: Sara Krulwich/The New York Times

Salman Rushdie’s satanically batty fantasy throws up his usual brew of Islamic mythology, pop culture, the grotesque, the baroque(...)

Patrick deWitt. Photograph: Ulf Andersen/Getty Images

Review: Gormenghast meets The Grand Budapest Hotel, with guest appearances from Kafka at his most lighthearted, in this playfully (...)

Review: Far better novels come to mind while reading this dull, talky and predictable exposé of global surveillance, writes Eileen(...)

Intent on feeling, Bill Clegg is clearly unafraid of melodrama and sentimentality; more talented writers have shown less courage. Photograph: Getty Images

Longlisted for the Man Booker but not worthy of being shortlisted, this small, tenacious novel about the aftermath of a family tra(...)

Pat Barker. Photograph: Ellen Warner

The last in a trilogy about a trio of artists is at its best in the Blitz, writes Eileen Battersby

László Krasznahorkai’s newly translated book ‘has everything anyone would wish to experience from reading’

Justin Cartwright’s new novel, set in the country of his youth, is laced with the author’s trademark humane irony

Courage: a likeable, amoral, three-dimensional rogue who inspired Bertolt Brecht’s Mother Courage and her Children nearly 300 years later. Photograph: Getty Images

A new translation of Grimmelshausen’s 17th century romp about a bawdy beauty captures its vigour

Review: A struggling film-maker attempts to penetrate the maneater mystique of Catherine the Great in this majestic novel by a vis(...)

Anne Enright: The Green Road (Jonathan Cape)

Tom McCarthy’s ‘Satin Island’ is the highlight of a varied and intriguing selection

JP Donleavy’s lively picaresque novel, first published in 1955, has never been out of print

 Maylis de Kerangal. Photograph:  Anne-Christine Poujoulat/AFP/Getty Images

Review: This French novel about a very American megaproject is both astonishingly lyrical and bracingly topical, writes Eileen Bat(...)

 Hodges Figgis manager Tony Hayes having an early look at Harper Lee’s Go Set a Watchman’, which goes on sale after midnight on Tuesday, July 14th. Many bookshops around the world country stayed open all night to allow devoted  fans  to get their hands on the  much-anticipated book from the author of To Kill A Mockingbird. Photograph: Photocall/

Eileen Battersby’s verdict on author’s much anticipated Go Set a Watchman

Gregory Peck  as attorney Atticus Finch in a scene from the 1962 movie To Kill a Mockingbird. While the trial is pivotal to the book, Go Set a Watchman is more about the grown Scout, now Jean Louise and her coming to terms with her world and also what she perceives as her father’s racism. Photograph: AP Photo

The convoluted history of Harper Lee’s Go Set a Watchman

The Dublin writer’s anticipated follow-up to the engaging ‘Skippy Dies’ tackles the financial crisis

‘The publishers are offering a rejected version of a loved novel as a sequel’

All hail The Book as it was meant to be read – as a book, between covers.

The days are long, the sun is high. There is plenty you could be doing, but instead why not sit back and read a decent book

Rufin creates convincing individuals with pitch-perfect dialogue

Among the best short story writers (top row): John Cheever, Eudora Welty, Raymond Carver; (Bottom row): Ron Rash, Flannery O’Connor and Richard Ford

From Cheever to Ron Rash, Carver to Eudora Welty, O’Connor to Richard Ford, some of the finest American writing is to be found in(...)

Cheers to Canada on Canada Day: Canadian writer Alistair Macleod, who writes with an unforced balance of instinct and wisdom. Photograph:  Steve Russell/Toronto Star/ Getty Images

There’s more to Canadian literature than the wonderful Alice Munro

Bringing in the wounded of the 1st Bedfordshire Regiment after the assault on the first day of the Battle of the Somme, July 1st, 1916. Photograph: The Art Archive / Imperial War Museum

On the anniversary of the assassination that triggered WWI, Eileen Battersby selects the books, many written by veterans, that il(...)

‘A Frenchman kills an Arab . . .’ This angry novel by an Algerian journalist is a bold riposte to Albert Camus’s existential class(...)

Gregory Peck  as Atticus Finch with Mary Badham as Scout and Phillip Alford as Jem in To Kill A Mockingbird, directed by Robert Mulligan. Photograph: Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images

From Bob Cratchit to Atticus Finch, from Philip Roth to Ivan Turgenev, Eileen Battersby surveys fathers in fiction and the authors(...)

A father and husband’s profound, human musings dominate this understated, quietly devastating Spanish novel set in the tense Basqu(...)

From Tony McCoy to Siegfriend Sassoon, from Jenny Uglow to Tim Winton, our literary correspondent has come up with a list of title(...)

Jim Crace in Dublin in 2013: Having worked as a journalist, he is interested in facts but does not allow them to impede his fiction, where he allows imagination and invention full liberty. “What’s wrong with making it up? It’s a story. It only has to feel real.” Photographer: Dara Mac Dónaill

‘Harvest is my lucky book,' says the 2015 Impac winner. 'It is also my most English book, but it’s funny, it’s also been my most u(...)

Jim Crace’s win is a victory for the art of fiction. One of the finest overall winners to date and only the fourth  English-language  winner, he is a self-described fabulist,  interested in ideas, not characters or even plot.  Harvest, set in  the late medieval world, tells the story of a rural community faced with  the break-up of common land as it is about to fall into the hands of the few

English-language fiction, currently overshadowed by the quality of translated writing, needed an outstanding work and Crace has wr(...)

British writer Jim Crace has won this year’s IMPAC award for his novel Harvest.

Novel is terrific and tells story of rural community faced with the coming of enclosure

James Joyce: time to yet again celebrate Joyce’s transfiguration of the commonplace into art. Photograph: Lipnitzki/Roger Viollet/Getty Images

Eileen Battersby details five good reasons to dive into a truly great work of fiction

Enrique Vila-Matas, right, with fellow Spanish writers Jordi Soler, Antonio Soler, Malcom Otero and Jose Antonio Garriga Vela and the late Dermot Healy, members of The Order of the Finnegans, launching their book on the subject at the Cervantes Institute in Dublin in 2010. Photograph: Alan Betson

Founder of the Order of Finnegans, dedicated to the celebration of James Joyce, the Spanish author’s familiarity with Irish lit(...)

John Shevlin dressed as James Joyce at Smock Alley Theatre, Dublin, in 2012. Photograph:   Bryan O’Brien

Eileen Battersby imagines what the central players of Joyce’s Ulysses think about the novel that made them famous and how they fe(...)

WB Yeats: a prevailing influence in the making of modern Ireland. He would seem to be not only Ireland’s enduring great poet, but the major Irish public man of the 20th century. Photograph: Getty Images

Paying tribute to the many faces and phases of Ireland’s global literary giant

Not one word is misjudged in Dutch novelist’s story of tragedy and memory

Saul Bellow, winner of the 1976 Nobel Prize in Literature at his home in Vermont in 1989: The honour came the year after Humboldt’s Gift , his most Nabokovian novel, and within months of To Jerusalem and Back, his non-fiction report of a journey to Israel. It is always valid to include that book because it is serious and Bellow, for all the gags and earthy set pieces, is very serious. Photograph: Dominique Nabokov / Liaison Agency

Eileen Battersby celebrates the work of the great American, Russian-inflected, Jewish writer, an undisputed master of language and(...)

Irreverent playfulness remains the key mark of the Czech master

Despite access to revealing documents, the biography lacks real insight and is a dull, overlong account of the writer’s life

Hispabooks is determined to showcase the best of contemporary Spanish writing from writers working in Spain’s four languages – and although English-languages publishers remain slow to take chances on literary fiction in translation unless it has already won several prizes, Hispabooks is proving that this no longer matters. Why wait on London or New York? Madrid is identifying quality literary fiction and making it available to a wider readership

Eileen Battersby invites you to say Si Si to great writing from Spain, the mother country of a magnificent global literature, and (...)

Jenny Erpenbeck, daughter of a philosopher father and a mother who translates from the Arabic, is a dreamer, a thinker and artist. She is also an east Berliner and this is a very German book; it is also a consummately European work with all the force of history

Winner of the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize 2015, a chilling and profound tapestry woven through the agonies of 20th-century E(...)

Chinua Achebe: balances the richness of African folklore and native speech with the sterile politicking inherited from outsiders, who ruled, influenced, then left, leaving their mess behind. Photograph: Jerry Bauer

To mark Africa Day, Ireland’s annual celebration of its African community, The Irish Times literary correspondent picks her favour(...)

Meryl Streep in Sydney Pollack’s 1985 film Out of Africa, which revived interest in the 1937 memoir by  Karen Blixen or Isak Dinsen in which it was based. It drew on her experiences running a coffee-plantation in Kenya, at first with her husband, then on her own. An eccentric Danish aristocrat may not seem the most likely chronicler of life in Africa but she is a natural storyteller, blessed with a precise, elegant and commendable flair for ironic epigrams

For Africa Day, Eileen Battersby selects 13 classic novels set in Africa but written by outsiders, including several Irish authors(...)

‘It is all so desperately funny because it is human’

From Slovenia comes this difficult but rewarding tale of a child who goes through life suffering and surviving the sins of his fat(...)

After Oxford, Richard Adams joined the civil service, rising to become assistant secretary in the department of environment. Trivia fans should note that Adams was a co-author of the Clean Air Act (1968). Photograph: Getty Images

The civil servant turned author’s staunch yeoman-like disposition helped him through early rejections, making one suspect that th(...)

Photograph: Getty Images

This clumsy debut novel never for a moment convinces in its setting, characters or conflict, says Eileen Battersby

London bobbies struggle to hold back surging crowd of Londoners massed in Parliament Square on VE Day, signalling end to WWII in Europe. Photograph: Getty Images/Bob Landry

Eileen Battersby: Europe’s streets lined with people too exhausted by six years of grief

A still from the 1930 Hollywood film of All Quiet on the Western Front, starring future Hollywood pacifist Lew Ayres as Paul Bäumer

‘We have become wild beasts. We do not fight, we defend ourselves against annihilation . . . ’ Erich Maria Remarque’s unmatchable (...)

Jennifer Johnston’s How Many Miles to Babylon? – Nomad Theatre stage version including  Fergal McElherron and Sam Peter Corry – represented important attempts to re-examine the first World War and its legacy. Photograph: Colm Henry

War writing at heart is about the ambivalence of loyalty to class, nation, and friends, and of belief and the business of being hu(...)

Shaken to the core by the memoirs of Primo Levi, a father of two obsesses over the Levis’ tiny Auschwitz prisoner in this urgent, (...)

To mark Freedom Day in South Africa, the Irish Times literary correspondent offers her selection of its finest literary works

A British soldier paying his respects in 1915 at the grave of a colleague near Cape Helles,  where the Gallipoli landings took place. Photograph: PA

The tragedy in the Dardanelles was not memorialised as much in fiction as the Western Front but there are still many books and poe(...)

Review: Lively coming-of-age novel with likeable, well-developed characters and convincing dialogue

Charles Dickens, William Shakespeare and Jane Austen: never mind the rampaging imperialism, says Eileen Battersby, feel the quality of England’s cultural heritage

Eileen Battersby marks St George’s Day with a kaleidoscopic celebration of our noisy neighbour’s contribution to world culture

Sixty-year-old absurdist comedy in the Civil Service remains as fresh as ever

Colum McCann: he is the only previous Impac winner on the shortlist, having won in 2011 for ‘Let the Great World Spin’. Photograph: Alan Betson / The Irish Times

Themes of war and real life dominate Dublin Literary Award shortlist

David Bennent as Oskar in Volker Schlöndorff’s 1979 film adaptation of The Tin Drum: “If there has to be the single greatest novel of the twentieth century, with all respect to James Joyce’s Ulysses and William Gaddis’s The Recognitions, this raucously mercurial debut could well be it”

The Tin Drum combines history, horror story, burlesque cartoon and satiric fable with vibrant, subversive imagery. Stylistically i(...)

Books written by German novelist and Nobel Prize winner Günter Grass at the  Dussmann book and media store in Berlin. John MacDougall/AFP/Getty Images

Start with the Danzig trilogy which includes Günter Grass’s majestic ‘The Tin Drum’

Günter Grass: darkly exuberant, experimental fiction

Günter Grass changed the way writers wrote fiction and challenged the way we look at the world

In Dada, the Croatian writer Olja Savičević has created a compelling witness who is also a survivor, not particularly heroic, but (...)

Hoot Owl – Master of Disguise by Sean Taylor, illustrated by Jean Jullien

The Irish Times literary correspondent channels her inner Book Elf to pick her favourite new children’s books

 Mario Varga Llosa. Photograph: Bryan O’Brien

Review: a lame-footed novel romp from a revered Nobel Laureate

The tragedy of one woman’s life shimmers with an unsettling resonance

World -class literature: James Joyce’s Ulysses might well take more than a day to read, unless a reader wishes to turn a day’s reading into a vigil without meals. Yet there is a stupendous feast of shorter books, novels and short stories, awaiting and all to be enjoyed at a leisurely pace in one day. Photograph: Frank Miller

The Irish Times literary correspondent offers her reading list to celebrate our national day

Han Kang (above) doesn’t waste a word as she tells the story

A savagely beautiful story of humanity crushed underfoot

A Russian cop holds on to his humanity in this heartfelt novel from a Dutch master

 Jennifer Johnston: Betrayal, hatred and the first World War have been major themes in her work. Photograph: Dara Mac Dónaill

Celebrating Irish women writers: ‘Jennifer Johnston is canny; her laconic narrators reveal her sophisticated grasp of the many fac(...)

Charlotte Brooke: No portrait of this pioneering 18th-century scholar and literary translator is known. In her preface to Reliques of Irish Poetry, Brooke wrote: “…it is really astonishing of what various and comprehensive powers this neglected language [Irish] is possessed. In the pathetic, it breathes the most beautiful and affecting simplicity; in the bolder species of composition, it is distinguished by a force of expression, a sublime dignity, and rapid energy, which is scarcely possible for any translator fully to convey; as it sometimes fills the mind with ideas altogether new, and which, perhaps, no modern language is entirely prepared to express.”

Celebrating Irish women writers: ‘in translating the work of the Gaelic poets into English, she was to influence Thomas Moore and (...)

 Dylan Thomas (1914-1953) in 1946: Mere mention of Wales for many is sufficient to ponder on the greatness of Dylan Thomas, a wayward genius whose eloquent fury continues to beguile, excite and inspire. Photograph: Picture Post / Hulton Archive / Getty Images

Eileen Battersby looks at and beyond the three great Thomases – Dylan, RS and Gwyn – to celebrate the rich literary tradition of o(...)

Booker-winner Ishiguro’s new novel, apparently set in post-Roman Britain, is a muddle wrapped in an enigma dunked in an allegory, (...)

 Amit Chaudhuri: “a master of the slow-moving meditation”.  Photograph by Ulf Andersen/Getty Images

Review: A witty, delicate new novel covering one day in the life of an Indian student in London pays homage to Joyce and Homer (...)

Saskia Reeves and Donal McCann taking a break from the shooting of the film December Bride in Anglesea Street, Dublin in 1989. Photograph: Paddy Whelan/The Irish Times

25 years after the release of the film version of Sam Hanna Bell’s book, Eileen Battersby examines one of Ireland’s finest novels(...)

Paperback review

Anne Tyler. Photograph: Diane Waler

It may be a mixed bag, but the American writer’s 20th novel offers moments of stark profundity

Rabih Alameddine’s novel, both clever and pretentious, is set in a maddeningly Americanised sitcom version of the Middle East

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee was published in 1960. It was immediately successful, winning the Pulitzer Prize, and has become a classic of modern American literature.

Lee makes it obvious it is not Robinson on trial, but the racism of the American South

 Harper Lee will publish her second novel, ‘Go Set a Watchman’, 60 years after the Pulitzer Prize-winning ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’. Photograph: Getty

‘New’ novel preceded Lee’s classic but was not published at the time

Laird Hunt: reinvigorates the American language with a poetic urgency equal to Toni Morrison’s Beloved

Laird Hunt’s staggering novel is ‘The Odyssey’ reimagined as one woman’s journey into the heart of darkness

Two women sit among the debris in the aftermath of the German bombardment of Leningrad in 1942. Photograph: D Trakhtenberg/ Slava Katamidze Collection/ Getty Images

On the anniversary of the end of the siege of Leningrad, Eileen Battersby celebrates a book that captures the heroism and misery o(...)

Primo Levi: “My Jewish identity took on a great importance following my deportation to Auschwitz. It is very likely that without Auschwitz I would never have written, and would have given only a little weight to my Jewish identity.”  He wrote in order to tell the world what happened. In time he would come to resent the literary world that regarded him not as an artist, only as witness. Photograph: Getty Images

Eileen Battersby recalls the day she met Primo Levi and assesses his career

David Malouf: poet and storyteller, he is one of the world’s finest writers and the surest way to experience his rare art is to simply read all of his elegant, graceful work. Photograph: Michael Stuparyk / Toronto Star via Getty Images

To mark Australia Day, our Literary Correspondent celebrates her literary wizards of Oz

Jenny Williams: the Dublin-based academic explored Hans Fallada’s life and motivations  in an outstanding biography, More Lives Than One, which was published in 1998 and in a revised edition drawing on additional material in 2012. Photograph: Brenda Fitzsimons

Irish academic Jenny Williams played a key role

Not just a pawn: Hans Fallada

Novelist’s daring chronicle provides a keyhole view of the daily paranoia of life under the Nazis

Seek out a copy of The Adventures of Shola by the Basque writer Bernardo Atxaga who wrote it in Euskera before translating the four individual stories into Spanish. Mikel Valverde’s illustrations are most expressive and the English translation comes courtesy of the great Margaret Jull Costa. If anything can succeed in hauling us through this most blue day of dark days, it is this book

Today is the most depressing day of the year. So what you need is a good book about a dog

Spy thriller is a labour of loyalty to the underrated and original Johnson

Photograph: Viktor Gårdsäter

Review: A bland Scandinavian debut novel about a failing marriage – and a hamster – demonstrates just how difficult it can be for (...)

Detail from Turner’s ‘A light in the Darkness’. Photograph: Alan Betson,

Every January Turner’s watercolours are put on show as requested in Henry Vaughan’s bequest

Donal McCann as Francis Hardy in the 1980 Irish premiere of ‘Faith Healer’ by Brian Friel, directed by Joe Dowling on Abbey stage. Photograph Fergus Bourke

Interactive website celebrates National Theatre’s achievements

‘Twas the night before Christmas and all the through the house . . .’

 Deirdre and Amber Hogan from Co Wicklow, part of the group  in the chamber at the Newgrange Monument on the morning of Winter Solstice for sun rise. The inclement weather obsqured the sunlight from entering the chamber. Photograph: Alan Betson/The Irish Times

Tenacious dogs, Santa hats and surly teens on hand for sunrise on misty Solstice day

A brilliantly deadpan take on modern-day office life

Alexander Pushkin: among his many literary talents was a flair for characterisation. Photograph: Universal/Getty

A founding text of the 19th century Russian novel, this is high art at its most effortless

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