An Irishman’s Diary on the camán

The art of the made-to-measure hurley

“Hurlers come into the workshop, where the smell of ash wafts from the curled slivers and sawdust lying on the floor. They take the hurley in their hands, feel the grip, run their hands over the smooth white surface. They look at the grain of the wood that curves with the bas, the wide striking area on the end of the hurley.” Photograph: Dara Mac Dónaill

“Hurlers come into the workshop, where the smell of ash wafts from the curled slivers and sawdust lying on the floor. They take the hurley in their hands, feel the grip, run their hands over the smooth white surface. They look at the grain of the wood that curves with the bas, the wide striking area on the end of the hurley.” Photograph: Dara Mac Dónaill

Tue, Jul 15, 2014, 01:00

Surely one of the most finely tuned sporting implements in the world is the hurling stick – or camán – used by senior players, men and women.

These exponents of the many skills of the game, especially controlling and hitting the leather sliotar, take exceptional care to match their hurleys to the strength and suppleness of their wrists and the muscles of their arms and shoulders.

Many have their hurleys made-to-measure by master craftsmen in the art of fashioning hurleys from the wood of the ash tree. The exact pattern is agreed upon. The length, usually to hip height, has to be right. The weight has to be precise.

Hurlers come into the workshop, where the smell of ash wafts from the curled slivers and sawdust lying on the floor. They take the hurley in their hands, feel the grip, run their hands over the smooth white surface. They look at the grain of the wood that curves with the bas, the wide striking area on the end of the hurley.

These players, female and male, sometimes hop a sliotar to make sure they’re comfortable with the balance. They may even go outside and bash a well-worn ball against a wall, assessing the weight and resilience of the stick.

Sometimes, after much handling and swinging, they may ask for a little wood to be shaved off here of there. Or they may do it themselves later, sometime using a shard of sharp glass.

The bas gets most attention because one of the basic skills is to be able to hit the sliotar with the dead centre, not much more than about twice the size of a €2 piece.

When the sliotar is hit with the “sweet spot” it rebounds off the ash and travels quickly and accurately.

To strengthen the bas, vulnerable in clashing with other hurleys during a game, a thin, light metal band is tacked in place. Centuries ago, Brehon laws decreed that only a king’s son was entitled to a bronze band while all others must use copper.

One of the great Tipperary hurlers of the past, Pat Stakelum, once told me about his hurleys. “They were made for me by a fellow called Willie Touhy. He knew exactly what I wanted. You could blindfold me and put me in a room with a thousand hurleys but I’d still find my own.”

The shape of the hurley has changed to meet the way the game in played. The hurleys of 100 years ago were narrower and the bas only gently curved. At that time the ball was played along the grass a good deal of the time, there was less lifting and striking or catching the ball; players became adept at hitting the moving ball, over or along the ground.

Sign In

Forgot Password?

Sign Up

The name that will appear beside your comments.

Have an account? Sign In

Forgot Password?

Please enter your email address so we can send you a link to reset your password.

Sign In or Sign Up

Thank you

You should receive instructions for resetting your password. When you have reset your password, you can Sign In.

Hello, .

Please choose a screen name. This name will appear beside any comments you post. Your screen name should follow the standards set out in our community standards.

Thank you for registering. Please check your email to verify your account.

We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 3 days from the date of publication.