Casting for role of Phil Lynott taking place in Dublin

Oscar-nominee Jim Sheridan and documentary maker Colm Quinn working on project

Phil Lynott fronted several bands in Ireland throughout the 1960s, before eventually forming Thin Lizzy. Photograph: The Irish Times

Phil Lynott fronted several bands in Ireland throughout the 1960s, before eventually forming Thin Lizzy. Photograph: The Irish Times

 

Producers are looking for someone to play the part of Phil Lynott in a documentary that will recount his rise to stardom.

An open casting is being held at 12-13 Bow Street, Dublin 7, from 12.30pm today for an actor/musician/singer aged 18-25.

Six-time Oscar nominee Jim Sheridan and award winning documentary maker Colm Quinn are working together on the documentary.

“Having known Phil, and loving his music from the very start, it’s a great honour to celebrate his life and work on the big screen,” said Sheridan.

“I see this as a non-fiction movie, one meant for the cinema, and I can’t wait to start the process of finding our modern day rocker.”

Casting agency MovieExtras.ie say experience in film and television is not essential. “Please come prepared with a song, poem or example of Philip’s influence on you. Auditions will be filmed and may form part of the final film,” it says.

It adds the successful applicant will work with professional mentors as well as those who influenced and worked with Lynott.

“Our aim is to capture the energy and charisma that Phil gave the world throughout his amazing career as Thin Lizzy’s front man. If you feel you can embody this rock legend, we want to meet you.”

Filming is due to take place on dates throughout 2017 while the documentary will be produced by Marcie Films and Eagle Rock Entertainment, with support from the Irish Film Board.

Lynott was born in England in 1949 and moved to Dublin to live with his grandmother in Crumlin at the age of four. He fronted several bands in Ireland throughout the 1960s, eventually forming Thin Lizzy in 1969.

The band had its breakthrough with The Boys Are Back in Town and the 1976 album Jailbreak.

Lynott collapsed on Christmas Day, 1986 and died days later as a result of pneumonia and heart failure, aged 36.

A statue of the musician was erected on Harry Street in Dublin in 2005.