Kate Mosse: Books of the Year

Elegant, witty collection satisfied my greed for nonfiction

 

After a year writing and publishing fiction, as a reader I find myself greedy for nonfiction. It was a delight to discover that Richard Eyre, the director and writer – and former director of the Royal National Theatre, in London – had a new book out. What Do I Know? (NHB) is an elegant, witty and thoughtful collection of personal interviews and essays on the big questions that haunt our times, from the Iraq War and the nature of Britishness to Alzheimer’s disease and the importance of arts subsidy.

Another timely, important book is Atul Gawande’s Being Mortal (Profile), a brilliant analysis of how we should be – but are not – living out our twilight years. Inspirational and humane, essential reading.

Finally, of course, the winner of the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction, Eimear McBride, with her debut novel, A Girl Is a Half-formed Thing (Galley Beggar/Faber). Lyrical and hard-hitting, with echoes of James Joyce and Gerard Manley Hopkins, it is a beautiful and sublime novel despite the tough subject matter.

Kate Mosse’s books The Taxidermist’s Daughter and The Mistletoe Bride and Other Haunting Tales are published by Orion
 

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