RCSI Art Award unveils its first sculpture

Atlas and Axis-inspired sculpture by Remco de Fouw will be on display at the RCSI campus on York Street

RHA president Mick O’Dea, the artist Remco de Fouw and RCSI president  Prof John Hyland with de Fouw’s new sculpture

RHA president Mick O’Dea, the artist Remco de Fouw and RCSI president Prof John Hyland with de Fouw’s new sculpture

 

The Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) has unveiled the inaugural commission from its annual Art Award.

The work is by Remco de Fouw, and consists of two peices, Atlas and Axis. The sculptural diptych take its name and inspiration from two vertebrae of the spine. The piece is made from Spanish alabaster and glass and will be on display in the York Street concourse area of the RCSI in Dublin.

The sculpture was unveiled by Prof John Hyland, president of the RCSI, with Mick O’Dea, president of the RHA.

The RCSI Art Award was established last year, in association with The Irish Times and the Royal Hibernian Academy (RHA) Annual Exhibition. Prof Cathal Kelly, chief executive and registrar at the RCSI said: “The RCSI Art Award is a celebration of the long-standing association between art, medicine and wellbeing and the common heritage of RCSI and the RHA.” He said the hoped the work would “inspire a sense of curiosity and discovery” in visitors to the RCSI campus.

Each year, one artist is selected from the RHA’s Annual Exhibition for the RCSI Art Award commission. De Fouw was selected last year for his sculpture Random Access Memory V. The shortlisted artworks for this year will be announced prior to the opening of the 187th RHA Annual Exhibition on May 21st (Varnishing Day), and the winner will be announced in mid-July before the 2017 exhibition closes. The recipient will get €5,000 and the RCSI silver medal. The successful artist will also receive a commission to the value of €10,000 for a new work for the RCSI collection.

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