The German public is acutely conscious of data privacy issues, as this  carnival float with a  caricature representing Google and Facebook in a Duesseldorf parade highlights. Photograph: Ina Fassbender

Officials accused of allying with industry in secret while championing privacy in public

Yanis Varoufakis: Proposed new measures to unlock remaining bailout funds. Photograph: Kostas Tsironis/Bloomberg

Yanis Varoufakis submits plan to euro group with measures including online gambling

 Chancellor Angela Merkel does not approve of binding quotas for women Photo: David Sleator/The Irish Times

Bundestag has approved 30% requirement for non-executives

Data mining: It’s hard to think of anything you can do these days – online or off – that doesn’t leave a trail of data crumbs

European institutions are in the process of replacing existing data rules from 1995 to ensure citizens are better protected

Security cameras  at the partially-finished new headquarters  of Germany’s federal intelligence service, the Bundesnachrichtendienst (BND). The construction  has suffered major delays, including the theft of blueprints. Photograph:  Adam Berry/Getty Images

Suspicious leak at foreign intelligence agency BND, the city’s most high-security building site

Former SPD politician Sebastian Edathy  in a  regional court in Verden, Germany, yesterday.  Photograph: Julian Stratenschulte/AP

Sebastian Edathy urged to leave the party

Greece’s Finance Minister, Yianis Varoufakis. In an interview marathon over the weekend, both Greek and German finance ministers tried to put very different spins on last week’s deal in Brussels.

Varoufakis said he would ask for debt rescheduling talks with European institutions

German finance minister Wolfgang Schaeuble after making his speech, near German Chancellor Angela Merkel, in the Bundestag in Berlinon Friday. Photograph: EPA

Pre- and post-election remarks in Greece ‘hadn’t made things easier, to put it mildly’

Former nurse, only identified as Niels H, hides his face behind a folder next to his lawyer Ulrike Baumann at the local court in Oldenburg, Germany. Photograph: Carmen Jaspersen/AP Photo/dpa

Niels H, who injected patients with medicine to induce cardiac arrest, may have killed 200

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