“In my intake at JPMorgan in the 1980s there was no race to the door by the smartest. Out of a group of 10 the two who quit after the first two years weren’t so much the brightest as the misfits – we were the ones who shouldn’t have been hired in the first place.” Photograph: Reuters/Eduardo Munoz

Opinion: the cleverest use top employers as a training ground and springboard to get out

The two things that people will always be better at than machines are motivating others and coming up with original ideas. Photograph: Getty Images

Momentous article based on years of research by firm’s sharpest minds

Being in the library at opening time is only cool if you’ve been up all night. Photograph: Getty Images

Looking gorgeous is cool. And looking thin. So is wearing the right clothes

A Moleskine notebook: ‘Electronic diaries are slowcoaches compared with the speedy paper version.’ Photograph: Daneil Rodriguez/iStockphoto.com

Opinion: paper is faster, requires no password and never runs out of batteries

As eBay clearly demonstrates, consumers are sometimes irrational. The data show auctions with an opening bid of 99p get buyers so excited they usually end up bidding the price up more than when the starting bid is higher. Photograph: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

As a DIY business school, there has never been anything like eBay - a place where animal spirits roam free and yet markets are tra(...)

Earlier this summer the New York Times carried a front-page story about a speech Barack Obama had given on US foreign policy with a headline referring to his “Cautious Reponse to World Crisis”.

Opinion: human’s ability to write comes with ability to err

Emailing when away, I reasoned, is inevitable, mildly useful, and fine so long as you use the drug in moderation, says Lucy Kellaway.

The further you are from work, the more its news disturbs you, writes Lucy Kellaway

Rather than dish out the bad news directly, the executive vice-president takes refuge behind a curious subjunctive: “We plan that this would result in an estimated reduction of 12,500 . . . employees.”

Microsoft executive Stephen Elop’s 1,100-word memo, which casually mentions massive job cuts, is a case study in how not to write(...)

With jobs, unlike with loo paper, there are many axes to grind. Photograph: Getty Images

People feel compelled to review everyday items but are more reticent regarding their work

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