Traders working at their desks in front of the DAX board at the Frankfurt stock exchange yesterday. Photograph: Reuters

How worried should we be about a slowdown in the German economy?

The ECB is always calling for structural reforms. Structural reforms are always politically difficult. They are only ever implemented by politicians brave and decent enough to think beyond the next election. So we hardly ever see them. Photograph: EPA

Nothing in economics to justify crude European fiscalism of today

The European Central Bank  in Frankfurt Main, Germany – weak and disappointing European growth has become one of life’s constants: one that leaves the euro area extremely vulnerable to shocks, even small ones. EPA/Boris Roessler

Our recovery outpaces that of other euro zone countries, but a wider risk remains

Thomas Piketty, the French economist whose work has fueled fierce debates about inequality. Photograph: Ed Alcock/The New York Times

The bigger debate is not over the numbers but his explanations of why inequality has evolved

Patrick Honohan, governor of the Central Bank of Ireland: “the recovery in economic activity is showing a somewhat stronger trend overall than previously signalled”. Photograph: Dara Mac Dónaill

Patrick Honohan has sounded an optimistic note on the economy – and with good reason

Despite the swooning over French economist Thomas Piketty, little of his analysis and conclusions on income inequality actually apply to Ireland. (Photograph: Ed Alcock/The New York Times)

Preconceived notions about income distribution don’t take into account the facts

It is surely not beyond the wit of Brussels to devise policies that boost regional capital spending while keeping a lid on the more fiscally irresponsible ambitions of local politicians. Photograph: Reuters

Lack of appetite to bolster Europe’s frail recovery astonishing

IMF managing director Christine Lagarde. The organisation is about to downgrade its economic forecasts for global growth this year

“Savers either have an irrational belief in what will happen next or a heroic cheerfulness that things will turn out OK”

To argue that we need to be “another Canary Wharf”, displays both poverty of imagination and a lack of understanding of the businesses that are based in London’s docklands. Photograph: Jason Alden/Bloomberg

This week we were told we need to copy the development experience of Canary Wharf

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