Donald Clarke

Whingeing about cinema and real life since 2009

Can anything beat Toy Story 3?

We are progressing into the last lap of the race for 2010 box-office champ. At time of writing, three days after the most Potterific candidate opened, Toy Story 3 still sits at the top. The latest Pixar film just squeezed …

Sun, Nov 21, 2010, 21:02

   

We are progressing into the last lap of the race for 2010 box-office champ. At time of writing, three days after the most Potterific candidate opened, Toy Story 3 still sits at the top. The latest Pixar film just squeezed past Alice in Wonderland to take prime position. The former has raked in $1.062 billion; the latter took in a whopping $1.024 billion.

Among the interesting factoids to note here is that, for the first time ever, one studio — venerable old Walt Disney — has racked up two billion-dollar movies in the same year. The success of Alice still strikes one as slightly baffling. It’s hard to find anybody who adored the thing. Plenty of people thought it was all right. Some people thought it was dire. But Alice lovers don’t exactly shout about their passion. At any rate, the presence of Johnny Depp — and the stubborn popularity of 3D — helped the picture become a great hit in Rest of the World. In the top 10, only Shrek: Forever After made a higher percentage of its takings outside the US.

Glancing at the calendar for next month, it’s hard to see anything other than Harry Potter shifting Toy Story 3 from top place (or, for that matter, Alice from second). The Tourist? Not really a young person’s film, I would guess. The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader? Well, given that Disney dropped the franchise, that doesn’t seem too likely. Tron Legacy or Gulliver’s Travels? Both should do okay, but neither looks like a chart topper.

No. It’s Harry Potter or nothing. Deathly Hallows ┬áhas opened well, but I suspect that the hiccup over 3-D might cost the picture any serious chance of securing top spot. It’s not that a significantly smaller number of punters will attend — this is Harry Potter, after all — but losing the 3-D surcharge on tickets will probably be (just) significant enough to relegate Ms Rowling’s gang to third place.

Meanwhile, Inception sits proudly in the top five. Good for Mr Nolan. The fan-boy enthusiasm may be bit wearing, but it’s great to see a picture that is neither a sequel, a remake nor even an adaptation do so well. When was the last time such a film figured that high in the hit parade? Huh? Huh? Huh?

Oh yeah. Last year with Avatar. Still, the result is encouraging. More on this when the race is run. Here’s how we currently stand:

1 Toy Story 3 ($1,062.7 million)

2 Alice in Wonderland ($1,024.3 million)

3 Inception ($820.0 million)

4 Shrek Forever After ($737.4 million)

5 The Twilight Saga: Eclipse ($691.3 million)

6 Iron Man 2 ($621.8 million)

7 Despicable Me ($520.2 million)

8 Clash of the Titans ($493.2 million)

9 How to Train Your Dragon ($493.2 million)

10 The Karate Kid ($358,7 million)

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