Donald Clarke

Whingeing about cinema and real life since 2009

Matthew Goode kicks the begorrah out of his own film!

Two weeks ago I wrote a piece in The Ticket in which, inspired by the wretchedness of Leap Year, I bemoaned patronising representations of Ireland in American films. If you were being kind you could have described the article as …

Thu, Mar 4, 2010, 23:19

   

Two weeks ago I wrote a piece in The Ticket in which, inspired by the wretchedness of Leap Year, I bemoaned patronising representations of Ireland in American films. If you were being kind you could have described the article as a bit of filler. At any rate, it wasn’t breaking any new ground.  I received, however, more emails (all supportive) in response to that piece than to anything else I have written over the past decade. The only article that generated a comparable amount was the one about bad behaviour in the cinema. You know what I mean. Fat cretins and their even stupider dates chatting mindlessly through the film while scoffing buckets of deep-fried offal and texing inanities to their lard-brained friends. Oh if I had a machete, I’d…

leap_year_06.jpg

Oim sah ashoimed of meesalf!”

Hang on. Were was I? Oh yeah. The anger generated by Leap Year really was something out of the ordinary. There’s an interesting contrast here. Whereas too many shoulder-chipped Irish Americans get their knickers in a twist at any joke consciously made at the expense of Hibernian stereotypes, the real Irish tend to appreciate the irony and laugh along. Consider Irish Central’s recent attempt to get annoyed at Ricky Gervais’s introduction for Colin Farrell at the Golden Globes. Niall O’Dowd bafflingly claimed that “Farrell did not look too pleased” with Ricky’s references to drunk hellraisers, but, when I asked Colin about it, he said: “I didn’t mind that dig at all. I was told that he wanted to introduce me and to be honest, I thought it could have been a lot worse. I thought it was really endearing. It was lovely.” Meanwhile, Irish Americans tolerate — and often propagate — the sort of sentimental twinkly version of Ireland seen in Leap Year.

It seems that even Matthew Goode, star of the film, has realised what a travesty it is. “It’s turgid. I just know that there are a lot of people who will say it is the worst film of 2010.” the English actor said. I’m still waiting for an explanation from director Anand Tucker. Recently lauded for his work on Red Riding, Mr Tucker is a smart bloke and really, really, should know better.

What else?

Well, in honour of International Woman’s Day, this week’s Ticket is inclining towards the distaff side. Enjoy Ms Tara Brady of Hot Press on the way women have, despite pioneering work in early Hollywood, been weirdly sidelined by the dream factory in later decades. Ms Anna Carey will be opining on strategies women should employ to get noticed at the Oscars. There’s also bound to be some super music stuff involving women. Pieces on Lynsey de Paul and Tina Charles, I imagine. This modern stuff is beyond me.

Read and opine.

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