Una Mullally

Society, life and culture on the edge

Beyond Katie Taylor

I wrote this piece on the visibility of sportswomen in Irish life for the weekend’s paper.   One of the things I’m interested in is not so much female athletes and sportspeople not getting coverage, but the type of coverage …

Mon, May 28, 2012, 11:12

   

I wrote this piece on the visibility of sportswomen in Irish life for the weekend’s paper.

 

One of the things I’m interested in is not so much female athletes and sportspeople not getting coverage, but the type of coverage women in sporting life receive. There is a change in language and subtleties when covering women in sport. Some sports, just by their history and traditions I guess, treat women fairly equally (except when it comes to the size of the trophies, prize money and sponsorship deals). Tennis is probably the best example of that.

But when playing what are traditionally seen as ‘men’s games’ then things get a little trickier. Of course men are marginalised in sports too, which is written about in the article, but as a rule, men’s sports still run the game, while women have to present incredible feats in order to get a look in. And even when they do, they’re often treated very differently.

I guess one of these points was proven over the weekend when The Sun based an entire article on Taylor around whether or not she has a boyfriend. Imagine being a four-time world champion and a journalist thinks that’s the important thing to ask? Where’s the respect?