Jim Carroll

Music, Life and everything else

The playlist – the sounds of the week at OTR HQ

Tracks from Leyla McCalla, CeCe Winans, Saba, Miles Mosley, Terry Dolan, Folamour, Horse Lords etc

Leyla McCalla

Fri, Jan 6, 2017, 09:48

   

CeCe Winans “Hey Devil!” (Pure Springs)

A righteous blast of soul-stirring, head-clearing and (yes) foot-moving gospel to get the new year off to a bracing start. Preach!

Saba “Bucket List Project” (Saba Pivot)

A fantastic state-of-the-city commentary with a blur of beautiful sounds from Chicago’s Saba.

Folamour “Shakkei” (All City)

All City debut for the French house slinger goes deep with a sweet and slinky Balearic vibe. Catch him at Codework at Dublin’s Sound House on January 13.

Terry Dolan “Inlaws and Outlaws” (High Moon Records)

A long-lost treasure, Terry Dolan’s previously unreleased 1972 debut album is an expansive West Coast wash of folk and rock’n'roll full of glorious sounds like this nugget

Miles Mosley “Abraham” (World Galaxy)

Mo’ from the West Coast Get Down crew’s big blast with bass don Miles Mosley leading the way on a killer groove which features such luminaries as Tony Austin (drums), Ryan Porter (trombone), Kamasi Washington (tenor sax), Cameron Graves (piano) and Brandon Coleman (vintage keys).

Webster Station “Are You For Real?” (Family Groove)

1979 Dayton disco-boogie with bells and whistles galore lovingly dusted off and re-upholstered by Family Groove.

Leyla McCalla “A Day For The Hunter, A Day For The Prey” (Jazz Village)

Immense stew of sounds and feelings galore on the title track from the former Carolina Chocolate Drop’s second solo album.

Joyce Manor “Fake I.D.” (Epitaph)

Sunny Cali pop-punk belter with hooks to swing from

Horse Lords “Interventions” (Northern Spy)

Drones to live by from the mighty Baltimore band on their third run around the tracks.

Various “Doing It In Lagos” (Soundway)

A fascinating document of Nigeria’s new pop dreamers, groovers and shakers from the 1980s as Lagos producers and singers swapped their Afrobeat roots for more cosmpolitan and glitzy pan-national pop threads. Full review here.