Jim Carroll

Music, Life and everything else

The wrap of the month

The Album Doctor, youth subcultures, Jon Ronson, Swedish pop music, unplugging, Silicon Valley, High Fidelity, The Sports Gene, data journalism, fast fashion, Killer Mike and much more

Killer Mike

Mon, Mar 31, 2014, 09:31

   

As we’ve mentioned before, one of our favourite sources for great tech, culture and business stories is Jason Hirschhorn’s daily MediaREDEF digest. Hirschhorn has now expanded into fashion (sign up to that newsletter here) and he recently talked to Digiday about his future plans for the curation service.

Some forensic number-crunching about that great media trusim that the Mail Online is a super-duper, winner-takes-all, sidebar-of-shame, cash-making machine. Bonus Mail: profile of Martin Clarke, the paper’s scrapper-in-chief

Great interview with Josh Leary AKA Evian Christ, the dude who went from training to be a schoolteacher to working with Kanye West.

Patrick Lonergan on the demise of Irish Theatre Magazine and what it means for a theatre criticism in Ireland. A lot of resonance here for anyone watching the current ins and outs of the media business.

If you want to understand pop, you have to speak Swedish. The rise and rise of Swedish pop music’s influence on the pop music we hear every day of the week.

More demise: whatever happened to the youth subcultures like mods, soulboys and goths?

Let’s be Frank: Patrick Freyne’s interview from today’s paper with recent Banter guest Jon Ronson

Is the Album Doctor in the house? Advice for U2, Lady Gaga, Britney Spears, Kelly Clarkson, Arcade Fire and Weezer from Steven Hyden.

The pointlessness of unplugging

One of the best things we saw at the recent SXSW was Silicon Valley, the new TV series from Mike Judge on the tech industry. Here are some thoughts from Mr Beavis and Butt-Head on the show – and here’s the trailer.

Some words of wisdom from one of our favourite rappers Killer Mike

In the words of Tom Waits, what are they building inside?

The sports dept: David “The Sports Gene” Epstein on how athletes have fulfilled that Olympic motto of “Citius, Altius, Fortius”

More sports dept: Grantland sits down with Billy “Moneyball” Beane

Data journalism blowback dept: the problem with data journalism and why Nate Silver’s FiveThirtyEight is kinda boring.

Music journalism blowback dept: how music journalism for the most part has become lifestyle reporting.

The man from Apple: a rare interview with Apple design don Jonathan Ive

The secret world of fast fashion: how a design idea cribbed from a runway show in Paris can make it onto the racks in your local High Street in a wide range of sizes within the space of a month.

#: the art of the hashtag

Stuart Dredge on the changing world of music discovery.

Steve Stoute’s The Tanning of America was a great read about how hip-hop culture changed the face of American business and economics. The book has been made into a VH1 TV series by Billy Corben and Alfred Spellman, with contributions from Puffy Daddy, Dr Dre, Russell Simmons, Pharrell, Nas, Reverend Run, Rick Rubin, Jimmy Iovine, Al Sharpton, Cory Booker, Tommy Hilfiger and many more. Watch the four-part series here.

For the record collectors in the audience: some deleted scenes from High Fidelty

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