Jim Carroll

Music, Life and everything else

The wrap of the week. Now with extra secret sauce

Ghostwriting, Pusha T, life at 93 years of age, swear words, confessions of an Uber cab driver, Japanese loos, Tinder, Nobrow, journalism cliches, oral history of SXSW Interactive, art forgeries and much more

The history of swearing

Mon, Mar 3, 2014, 09:31

   

If you only read one fantastic, enthralling and entertaining piece about ghostwriting this week, make sure it’s Andrew O’Hagan on his encounters with Julian Assange.

The king of New York: how Jimmy Fallon brought The Tonight Show back home to New York City.

How producers have gone from digging in the crates in dusty record stores to simply surfing YouTube in search of elusive beats.

Question of the day: why aren’t we all using Japanese toilets?

Pusha T on providing the entertainment at drug dealers’ birthday parties and other tales of grinding. He plays Dublin’s Vicar Street on June 9. His ace album from a few months ago, “Ny Name Is My Name”, streaming below

Confessions of an Uber cab driver.

The aging game: Roger Angell on life as a 93 year old

Superb archive piece by John Seabrook on nobrow culture. His book Nobrow, on the culture of marketing (and the marketing of culture), is also worth checking out.

Inside the New York rock scene of the 1970s – or, to quote author Lisa Robinson, “the amped-up, sequin-studded, punk-powered explosion” at Max’s Kansas City, CBGBs and other assorted dives.

Art dept: Wolfgang Beltracchi and his multimillion dollar art forgeries. Might be far, far better to study the advice of art dealer Stefania Bortolami in how to spot and develop future talent

Oral history (1): the inside story of South By Souhtwest Interactive by the folks who were there from the get-go. The countdown for SXSW 2014 has well and truly begun – expect OTR broadcasts from Texas all next week

Deep in the heart of Texas: if you’re one of the thousands of bands going to SXSW next week, this is essential reading before you head to the airport.

SXSW prediction: a lot of people will be wowing about Holy Child in a fortnight’s time

Cliche count: every journalist in the audience will shudder at how many of these expressions we’ve used in the last few weeks.

15 rules for great headlines. Including “always write 25 headlines”

Speaking of which…Headline of the day: did I passively ingest heroin being smoked by a new rave band? Priya Elan remembers his days writing about music. Another winner from Noisey

Ben Smith from Buzzfeed does some musing on how Twiter and Facebook will (mostly) save journalism.

The internet is fucked – plus how we can fix it

How Tinder won the sex-app arms race

Emily Gould on how much it cost her to write her first novel

Feck: the fascinating stories behind all of your favourite four letter words

What happens on tour doesn’t always stay on tour as tour managers for Foo Fighters, Rolling Stones and Fleetwood Mac tell tales of life on the road.

Oral history (2): who you gonna call? The who, what, why, how and where of Ghostbusters.

Cash in your chips: two gamblers, Bill Krackomberger and Michael Shinzaki, on what it’s really like to make your living from punts

Tune!

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