Jim Carroll

Music, Life and everything else

It’s not dead (yet), but MySpace badly needs a makeover

The cool kids may have abandoned MySpace, but that doesn’t mean it’s gone the way of Bebo (yet). The once mighty music social networking site has been on deathwatch since the advent of newer, brighter and snazzier sites Twitter and …

Fri, Jan 20, 2012, 09:38

   

The cool kids may have abandoned MySpace, but that doesn’t mean it’s gone the way of Bebo (yet). The once mighty music social networking site has been on deathwatch since the advent of newer, brighter and snazzier sites Twitter and Facebook, which have come along and usurped all its buzz.

Not even a changing of the guard and figureheads from Rupert Murdoch and News Corp (who recently used his new-found love of tweets to remark that they “screwed up in every way possible” with MySpace) to Justin Timberlake and Specific Media has arrested MySpace’s slide.

Yet figures last week indicated that MySpace is still getting clicks. In fact, the site founded by Tom Anderson and Chris DeWoulfe back in the internet middle-ages (or 2003) is pulling more traffic than Google+ or Tumblr, according to the latest ComScore social media stats.

Even though MySpace still scores highly on Google search results – it’s usually the first or second result for any band, for instance – it’s still a turn-up for the books.

But even if MySpace is getting traffic, what the hell is there to see and do on the site when you get there to make you stick around? MySpace’s biggest problem is that it simply hasn’t evolved. Every single function the site once had to attract users has been bettered elsewhere. Soundcloud and Bandcamp have better media players, Twitter is prefered for chirpy interaction and Facebook is now the go-to guy for messing with your privacy options.

At last week’s CES convention in Las Vegas, Timberlake debuted MySpace TV, which looks as bland and predictable as it sounds. Time for some better, smarter makeovers or the $35 million spent by Specific on acquiring the site will follow News Corp’s $580 million purchase price in 2005 down the plughole.

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