Jim Carroll

Music, Life and everything else

EP10: Sunday highlights

There can be only one highlight yesterday for this writer and it was, of course, a non-musical one. Tipperary put an end to that drive-for-five with a display of fierce, powerful, intense, majestic, inspirational hurling which tore Kilkenny apart and …

Mon, Sep 6, 2010, 03:33

   

There can be only one highlight yesterday for this writer and it was, of course, a non-musical one. Tipperary put an end to that drive-for-five with a display of fierce, powerful, intense, majestic, inspirational hurling which tore Kilkenny apart and left them flat on their backs. No-one but no-one gave Tipp a chance going into the game – understandable, of course, because Kilkenny were, after all, the undisputed kings of the hill until yesterday at 5.05pm – but that didn’t stop Liam Sheedy’s men. Tipp are well and truly back in the senior hurling business. Thurles is going to be bonkers on Monday night.

Due to the above (which I watched in the Daily Ticket shed along with fellow hurling afficiandos Harry and Ronan) and getting overview copy together for Monday’s paper, I really didn’t get to see as many acts on Sunday as on other days. Still, I did get to see and enjoy some crackers.

Fever Ray: their first proper Irish show (everyone involved is keen to forget the Oxegen fiasco) was one of the first time in ages when it felt like you were experiencing and participating in a piece of art instead of just standing at a gig. Striking stage-set (lamps as stage-lights, lashings of dry ice and a couple of lasers) and deliriously slow-motion and low-slung electronic pop anthems. Minds were blown into tiny little pieces throughout the tent.

Two Door Cinema Club: oh yes, the Bangor boys really are that big. It’s amazing what a few aul’ TV ads can do for a band’s profile. But then again, when the tunes are as bright, boppable and brassy as these, you can understand the stickability. A rapid 18 months’ rise which shows no signs of abating.

Liquid Liquid: New York underground veterans gave it socks with cowbells, angular grooves and the kind of multi-dimensional funk that deserves its open Open University course. They did “Cavern” too, one of the greatest beats of all time.

The National: despite my initial thoughts about The National and the main stage, their downbeat grandeur and shabby epics were tailormade for the big stage as the breeze blew the drizzle onto the players. A show which added further lustre to their reputation in this country and whetted appetites for their return to Ireland in December. It sure is a long way from the Cobblestones.