Jim Carroll

Music, Life and everything else

Going DEAF again

This year’s Dublin Electronic Arts Festival (DEAF) will be an Asian-themed event when it returns for its sixth outing in October. Highlights of this year’s programme will include performances from traditional instrumentalists Pamelia Kurstin, Wu Fei and Miya Masaoka in …

Fri, Aug 24, 2007, 08:37

   

This year’s Dublin Electronic Arts Festival (DEAF) will be an Asian-themed event when it returns for its sixth outing in October.

Highlights of this year’s programme will include performances from traditional instrumentalists Pamelia Kurstin, Wu Fei and Miya Masaoka in St Audoen’s Church on Thomas St, Thai film screenings, a new dance piece from Trevor Knight and veteran cinematographer Christopher Doyle discussing his experiences in the Hong Kong film industry.

This year will also see the return of both the DEAF Junior workshops and the DEAF publication (to be designed by Niall Sweeney), plus showcases from the D1 label’s Asian acts, collaborations between visiting acts and homegrown ones, club appearances from DJ Styles and The Boredoms and Eamonn Doyle’s photo exhibition focusing on Parnell St’s new Asian residents.

According to DEAF’s Karen Walshe, it was a natural move on from last year’s homegrown theme.

“We want to reflect what’s going on in the city centre, particularly around Parnell St where DEAF and the D1 label are based,” she explains. “It’s very much in your face, yet we feel Asian culture here is not yet celebrated enough,” says Walshe

DEAF has certainly changed enormously in scope and content since its 2002 debut, which featured electronic music showcases, club nights and an opening event at Imma with the Crash Ensemble and Donnacha Dennehy.

“When we started out, we had our roots very much in club culture and we were trying to do everything and involve every club and pub in the city. We’ve done that and we know we can do that, so we’ve got a lot more focused and we can define exactly what we’re going for. We still want to invite everyone to be involved, though, ” says Walshe.

The Arts Council have also become important DEAF supporters of late. “Their involvement and funding has been really important for the festival because it shows that we’ve been given the nod and that we’re not just a dance music festival,” says Walshe.

DEAF will take place from October 25th to 29th.