Friday 28th August 2015
Generation Emigration

www.irishtimes.com

‘It’s difficult to emigrate, but moving home is harder’ I never intended to stay away from Ireland for so long. I don’t think most emigrants do when they first take flight, says Clare Waldron, who is returning to live in Ireland after 30 years abroad.
Testimony: A poem for my daughter on her departure As the cardboard boxes stood in the hall and the packing process was underway, Margaret O'Donnell was inspired to write a poem reflecting on her daughter's life and her departure for London in search of work as an architect.
Remembering my mother at Christmas Lives lived abroad garner subtle differences. Perceptions are altered. We who leave never forget our roots but we soon see things differently. Emigration instils a sense of independence and family bonds are shaken loose and set adrift with the passage of time, writes Philip Lynch.
No call for turkey heroics Down Under Christmas in Australia is centred around barbecues, surfing, cricket and yacht races, but memories of my Irish Christmases are never far from my mind, writes Philip Lynch
Home for holidays: emigrants welcomed home for Christmas VIDEO: The Irish Times visited Dublin Airport today to speak to groups of families and friends as they welcome their loved ones home for Christmas.
One last family Christmas in the Caribbean Our family faced bereavements, redundancy and cancer diagnosis this year. After a challenging 12 months, we're taking our teenagers for one last family Christmas in Martinique rather than making the trek back from Brussels to Dublin, writes Des Collins
First my uncle left, then my siblings, now my son For generations, Irish families have been saying goodbye to loved ones. But no parent wants to consider the possibility that it might be for good, writes ELAINE HARTIGAN
‘Going was easy. Staying away is much more complicated’ I was a naive young man when I left Ireland in the 1980s, with no idea what was in store for me in Australia. As the years have gone by, saying goodbye after visits home and staying away has felt more poignant and painful, writes Philip Lynch.