Generation Emigration

The Irish Times forum by and for Irish citizens abroad

Emigration news: what you might have missed…

Emigration exhibitions, economic reports, diaspora blogger awards and a cheesy GAA song for the London team

Detail from 'On Diaspora Road' by Bernard Canavan

Tue, Jul 16, 2013, 17:15

   

Ciara Kenny

The Generation Emigration blog has been quieter than usual over the past three weeks as I sneaked off on annual leave, but here’s a quick round up of all the things I would have blogged about, had I been here:

The Little Museum of Dublin has a new exhibition documenting Irish emigration to the US. Your Huddled Masses also highlights Irish cultural heritage in America, and runs until September.

The prevalence of emigration and immigration are among the themes covered by ten photographic artists addressing ‘the crisis in Ireland’ in an exhibition for the PhotoIreland festival, which runs at the Gallery of Photography in Temple Bar until August 11th. Also in the visula arts, an exhibition of Bernard Canavan’s paintings in Longford last week portrayed the experiences of Irish emigrants who have slipped from visual memory. Read John Fleming’s account.

Crosscare Migrant Project have some good advice for Irish citizens who leave Ireland but want to retain their citizenship in their June newsletter. The organisation has also recently updated their factsheet on moving to Europe.

Blog Awards Ireland have opened a new category this year, ‘Best Blog from the Irish Diaspora’, which is open to any blogger who has Irish roots and lives overseas. Click here to find out more or nominate your blog before July 31st.

In more serious news, the bleakest of three possible scenarios for Ireland forecast by the Economic and Social Research Institute’s medium-term review last week, the EU will not return to growth before 2020, the unemployment rate will remain steady and emigration will average 22,000 per year. Given 46,500 Irish left in 2011, the last year for which statistics are available, this is in fact a considerable decrease.

The Live Register fell by 2,500 in in June bringing the standardised unemployment rate to 13.6 per cent, but, as usual, emigration is being cited by many as the reason for the fall. Dan O’Brien analyses how the under-25s have been most affected by the jobs crisis. Independent TD Clare Daly confronted the Taoiseach about the unemployment crisis in the Dáil last Wednesday, saying the one in three young people who were jobless would be one in two if not for emigration.

In the Wild Geese column in Business, Simon Carswell interviewed Donard Gaynor, former senior executive at US spirits and wine company Beam, living in New Jersey; Bill Corcran spoke with mining and sustainable forestry entrepreneur Paul O’Donoghue in Mozambique; while Olive Keogh interviewed Robin Fitzgerald, principal of water resources with international engineering and environmental services firm Klohn Crippen Berger in Vancouver.

Also in Business, Mark Hilliard reported on a new survey which revealed one quarter of Irish companies have experienced difficulty recruiting because of emigration.

Tánaiste Eamon Gilmore was in Washington last week to meet members of the US congress to lobby for their support for new immigration legislation. Read Simon Carswell’s report, which includes a concise background to the reforms, here. President Barack Obama also used his weekly address to make his case for immigration reform.

And finally… GAA fans in London are all-aflutter about the London GAA team, who will face Mayo in the Connacht provincial final this Sunday. More on this later in the week, but for now, here’s their team song recorded specially in preparation for this weekend’s clash:

YouTube Preview Image

 

We reserve the right to remove any content at any time from this Community, including without limitation if it violates the Community Standards. We ask that you report content that you in good faith believe violates the above rules by clicking the Flag link next to the offending comment or by filling out this form. New comments are only accepted for 10 days from the date of publication.